China-DPRK/Christopher Hill

Joint efforts needed to solve DPRK nuclear issue: former U.S. negotiator

  • English

Shotlist


Singapore - June 10, 2018 (CCTV- No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Marina Bay, Merlion Fountain

Beijing, China - June 8, 2018 (CCTV- No access Chinese mainland)
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Hill, former U.S. nuclear negotiator (ending with shot 3):
"I think our president is someone who wants to see results. And I think he's prepared to take risks to get results. I think he's unconventional. When I was doing this, I had people say 'well, you got to do this, this, and this before you do that.' I think the president will be more focused on getting something done. So on a way, that will be good. But in other ways, he doesn't have a lot of experience in these diplomatic matters. And I think you do need patience."

Sentosa Island, Singapore - June 9, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
3. Aerial shots of Capella Hotel

Singapore - June 10, 2018 (CCTV- No access Chinese mainland)
4. Various of St Regis hotel

Beijing, China - June 8, 2018 (CCTV- No access Chinese mainland)
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Hill, former U.S. nuclear negotiator (starting with shot 4):
"We have to work with, I think, a real consistency of purpose and I very strongly believe it can not be solved by the U.S., it can not be solved by China. China can not say, 'you solve it, America.' We can not say, 'you solve it, China.' But together, we should be able to deal with this. "

Singapore - June 10, 2018 (CCTV- No access Chinese mainland)
6. Various of security

Beijing, China - June 8, 2018 (CCTV- No access Chinese mainland)
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Hill, former US nuclear negotiator (starting with shot 6, partially overlaid with shot 8):
"To be very frank, China was extremely important to this entire process. China controlled the pen. China had a very deep responsibility to try to understand what the U.S. wanted, what the North Koreans wanted, what the Japanese wanted, because sometimes the Japanese had specific issues that they were interested in. So it was a responsibility to try to bring in all these different perspectives. And I think China did it very well. And I think all the Chinese people who watch this should have been very proud to see what the Chinese delegation did."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
Singapore - June 9, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
8. Aerial shots of Sentosa Island view
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
9. Sentosa logo
10. Various of tourists on beach

Storyline


Joint efforts by big powers are needed to solve the longstanding nuclear issue of the Korean Peninsula, and China has played and will continue to play an important role in the denuclearization process of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), according to a former U.S. nuclear negotiator.

Christopher Hill, who served as the U.S. Ambassador to Iraq from 2009 to 2010, takes a recent interview with the China Global Television Network and talks about his belief about the first milestone summit meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and top DPRK leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore on Tuesday.

The former ambassador believes Trump’s personality is serious about getting things done when it comes to the thorny issue.

"I think our president is someone who wants to see results. And I think he's prepared to take risks to get results. I think he's unconventional. When I was doing this, I had people say 'well, you got to do this, this, and this before you do that.' I think the president will be more focused on getting something done,” he said.

However, he urges more patience on the part of Trump.

"So on a way, that will be good. But in other ways, he (Trump) doesn't have a lot of experience in these diplomatic matters. And I think you do need patience," said Hill.

The Trump-Kim summit is the latest in a long run of nuclear negotiations. In 2003, the Chinese government brokered the six-party talks on the Korean Peninsula nuclear issue involving China, the DPRK, the United States, South Korea, Russia and Japan. When the first round was held in Beijing in August 2003, the principle of peacefully resolving the nuclear issue through negotiations was established.

The U.S. delegation to the six-party talks between 2005 and 2007 was led by Ambassador Christopher Hill, who still holds that concerted efforts of different parties are pivotal to resolving the issue.

"We have to work with, I think, a real consistency of purpose and I very strongly believe it can not be solved by the U.S., it can not be solved by China. China can not say, 'you solve it, America.' We can not say, 'you solve it, China.' But together, we should be able to deal with this," said Hill.

China has played an extremely important in the six-parity talks since it has to accommodate interests and concerns of different parities, according to Hill.

"To be very frank, China was extremely important to this entire process. China controlled the pen. China had a very deep responsibility to try to understand what the U.S. wanted, what the North Koreans wanted, what the Japanese wanted, because sometimes the Japanese had specific issues that they were interested in. So it was a responsibility to try to bring in all these different perspectives,” said Hill.

Hill speaks positively of China's role in the maneuvers.

"And I think China did it very well. And I think all the Chinese people who watch this should have been very proud to see what the Chinese delegation did," he said.

The six parties in 2005 made a joint statement in which the six parties unanimously reaffirmed the goal of verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner.

In the statement, the DPRK "committed to abandoning all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs" but insisted on its right to peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The United States affirmed that it had no nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula and had no intention of attacking or invading the DPRK with nuclear or conventional weapons. South Korea reaffirmed its commitment not to receive or deploy nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula and promised there existed no nuclear weapons within its territory.

However, the agreement failed to be effectively implemented due to a divergence on the nuclear declaration between the DPRK and the United States in 2007.

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  • ID : 8082935
  • Published : 2018-06-12 16:24
  • Last Modified : 2018-06-12 16:24:56
  • Location : Beijing,China
  • Category : politics
  • Duration : 2'15
  • Audio Language : English/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 2
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