USA-Brexit Vote/Interview

No-deal Brexit rejection limits May's bargaining room with EU: expert

  • English

Shotlist


FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. British national flag, EU flags, buildings
2. Brexit posters, banners; visitors

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Yuval Weber, fellow, Kennan Institute, Daniel Morgan Graduate School (ending with shots 4-5):
"So what happened today is that the government wanted the Parliament to reject no-deal, but what the Parliament did instead was offer an amendment that made no-deal a permanent policy of the Parliament itself. So what that did is it took away Theresa May’s ability to dangle no-deal against the Europeans, and the EU I should say, in order to get a better deal from them. So we’ll have going forward is that no-deal is not an option that Theresa May can point to, which limits her bargaining space with the European Union.”
4. Weber speaking at CGTN program

FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Various of Brexit posters, banners

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
6. Weber speaking at CGTN program
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Yuval Weber, fellow, Kennan Institute, Daniel Morgan Graduate School (partially overlaid with shots 8-9):
"Worst case scenario is that it comes in two flavors. One, is that this sort of uncertainty just continues indefinitely, and what businesses will do is sort of like what people do under any sorts of stress, they just try to leave, they’ll come up with their own exit options, and what we would see is basically a slowdown of economic activity in the UK while this essentially works itself out. And if this could take months or years, then you would see just a general contraction of economic activity, general recession and that would be essentially the slow motion version. The quick motion version of the worst case is just basic pandemonium. The flights can’t come in and out of the UK, medicines don’t come in or out, food doesn’t come in or out.”

++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++
FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
8. Various of buyers, sellers at open market

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
9. Weber speaking at CGTN program
++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++

FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
10. Various of traffic, pedestrians

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
11. Weber speaking at CGTN program
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Yuval Weber, fellow, Kennan Institute, Daniel Morgan Graduate School (starting with shot 11)(partially overlaid with shots 13-14):
"So what probably I would say the biggest two sources of danger to UK politics, in terms of thinking where sources of stability, is that the UK as a political entity may also cease to exist, because both Northern Ireland and Scotland voted to remain. But one of the big issues here is what they have been calling the ‘backstop’. How does Northern Ireland be both on the Irish island as well as part of the UK, and what would happen if Ireland and Northern Ireland, as part of the peace agreement with the Good Friday Accords between Catholic and Protestant communities, if they don’t keep basically that border open, and there is some sort of no-deal Brexit, what would then happen is Northern Ireland would suddenly become very suspiciously this economic powerhouse, because it would basically be this backdoor between the European Union and the UK, and that would essentially go against the idea of Brexit itself. Additionally, there could be a secession referendum in Scotland for independence, there could be reunification referendum in Ireland. And then when it comes to the internal British politics, it may not be possible for the Conservative and Labor parties to survive in the forms that have for the past one to two hundred years, because this is not about left, right, Conservative, Labor, but what is your idea of Britain, what is the idea of the UK, and that basically could break apart these parties and lead to a totally new vision for party politics within the UK.”

++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++
FILE: London, UK - 2017 (Exact Date Unknown) (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
13. Various of Big Ben
14. Tower Bridge
++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++

FILE: London, UK - Nov 17, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
15. Various of British national flags, buildings

Storyline


The no-deal Brexit rejection in UK parliament will limit Theresa May's negotiation with the European Union (EU) and the uncertainty over Brexit could damage the country politically and economically, a U.S. expert said on Wednesday.

Speaking with China Global Television Network (CGTN) in Washington D.C., Yuval Weber, Kennan Institute fellow at the Daniel Morgan Graduate School, made the comments after a no-deal Brexit was fully ruled out by the British parliament.

British lawmakers on Wednesday night voted by a margin of 43 to confirm their decision to reject any no-deal Brexit. It means a no-deal Brexit was completely ruled out by the parliament in a vote which led to a second government defeat in less than one hour.

"So what happened today is that the government wanted the Parliament to reject no-deal, but what the Parliament did instead was offer an amendment that made no-deal a permanent policy of the Parliament itself. So what that did is it took away Theresa May’s ability to dangle no-deal against the Europeans, and the EU I should say, in order to get a better deal from them. So we’ll have going forward is that no-deal is not an option that Theresa May can point to, which limits her bargaining space with the European Union,” said Weber.

The parliament will also vote to decide whether to delay Brexit on Thursday.

The expert said the uncertainty over Brexit, in the worst case, may lead to civil disorder and more economic uncertainty in the UK.

"Worst case scenario is that it comes in two flavors. One, is that this sort of uncertainty just continues indefinitely, and what businesses will do is sort of like what people do under any sorts of stress, they just try to leave, they’ll come up with their own exit options, and what we would see is basically a slowdown of economic activity in the UK while this essentially works itself out," he said.

The expert said it is likely to have an economic recession in the UK if the Brexit process takes a long period of time.

"And if this could take months or years, then you would see just a general contraction of economic activity, general recession and that would be essentially the slow motion version. The quick motion version of the worst case is just basic pandemonium. The flights can’t come in and out of the UK, medicines don’t come in or out, food doesn’t come in or out,” added Weber.

Speaking of the impacts of Brexit on UK politics, Weber said it is a route to a divided Britain that a referendum on Scottish independence or a referendum on Irish reunification may occur. As the result, the Conservative and Labor parties would break part.

"So what probably I would say the biggest two sources of danger to UK politics, in terms of thinking where sources of stability, is that the UK as a political entity may also cease to exist, because both Northern Ireland and Scotland voted to remain. But one of the big issues here is what they have been calling the ‘backstop’. How does Northern Ireland be both on the Irish island as well as part of the UK, and what would happen if Ireland and Northern Ireland, as part of the peace agreement with the Good Friday Accords between Catholic and Protestant communities, if they don’t keep basically that border open, and there is some sort of no-deal Brexit, what would then happen is Northern Ireland would suddenly become very suspiciously this economic powerhouse, because it would basically be this backdoor between the European Union and the UK, and that would essentially go against the idea of Brexit itself. Additionally, there could be a secession referendum in Scotland for independence, there could be reunification referendum in Ireland," he said.

"And then when it comes to the internal British politics, it may not be possible for the Conservative and Labor parties to survive in the forms that have for the past one to two hundred years, because this is not about left, right, Conservative, Labor, but what is your idea of Britain, what is the idea of the UK, and that basically could break apart these parties and lead to a totally new vision for party politics within the UK,” he added.

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8105634
  • Published : 2019-03-14 16:00
  • Last Modified : 2019-03-14 16:01:38
  • Location : United States
  • Category : politics
  • Duration : 3'11
  • Audio Language : English/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 2

USA-Brexit Vote/Interview

No-deal Brexit rejection limits May's bargaining room with EU: expert

Dateline : March 13, 2019/File

Location : United States

Duration : 3'11

  • English


FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. British national flag, EU flags, buildings
2. Brexit posters, banners; visitors

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Yuval Weber, fellow, Kennan Institute, Daniel Morgan Graduate School (ending with shots 4-5):
"So what happened today is that the government wanted the Parliament to reject no-deal, but what the Parliament did instead was offer an amendment that made no-deal a permanent policy of the Parliament itself. So what that did is it took away Theresa May’s ability to dangle no-deal against the Europeans, and the EU I should say, in order to get a better deal from them. So we’ll have going forward is that no-deal is not an option that Theresa May can point to, which limits her bargaining space with the European Union.”
4. Weber speaking at CGTN program

FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Various of Brexit posters, banners

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
6. Weber speaking at CGTN program
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Yuval Weber, fellow, Kennan Institute, Daniel Morgan Graduate School (partially overlaid with shots 8-9):
"Worst case scenario is that it comes in two flavors. One, is that this sort of uncertainty just continues indefinitely, and what businesses will do is sort of like what people do under any sorts of stress, they just try to leave, they’ll come up with their own exit options, and what we would see is basically a slowdown of economic activity in the UK while this essentially works itself out. And if this could take months or years, then you would see just a general contraction of economic activity, general recession and that would be essentially the slow motion version. The quick motion version of the worst case is just basic pandemonium. The flights can’t come in and out of the UK, medicines don’t come in or out, food doesn’t come in or out.”

++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++
FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
8. Various of buyers, sellers at open market

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
9. Weber speaking at CGTN program
++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++

FILE: London, UK - Exact Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
10. Various of traffic, pedestrians

Washington D.C, USA - March 13, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
11. Weber speaking at CGTN program
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Yuval Weber, fellow, Kennan Institute, Daniel Morgan Graduate School (starting with shot 11)(partially overlaid with shots 13-14):
"So what probably I would say the biggest two sources of danger to UK politics, in terms of thinking where sources of stability, is that the UK as a political entity may also cease to exist, because both Northern Ireland and Scotland voted to remain. But one of the big issues here is what they have been calling the ‘backstop’. How does Northern Ireland be both on the Irish island as well as part of the UK, and what would happen if Ireland and Northern Ireland, as part of the peace agreement with the Good Friday Accords between Catholic and Protestant communities, if they don’t keep basically that border open, and there is some sort of no-deal Brexit, what would then happen is Northern Ireland would suddenly become very suspiciously this economic powerhouse, because it would basically be this backdoor between the European Union and the UK, and that would essentially go against the idea of Brexit itself. Additionally, there could be a secession referendum in Scotland for independence, there could be reunification referendum in Ireland. And then when it comes to the internal British politics, it may not be possible for the Conservative and Labor parties to survive in the forms that have for the past one to two hundred years, because this is not about left, right, Conservative, Labor, but what is your idea of Britain, what is the idea of the UK, and that basically could break apart these parties and lead to a totally new vision for party politics within the UK.”

++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++
FILE: London, UK - 2017 (Exact Date Unknown) (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
13. Various of Big Ben
14. Tower Bridge
++ SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE ++

FILE: London, UK - Nov 17, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
15. Various of British national flags, buildings


The no-deal Brexit rejection in UK parliament will limit Theresa May's negotiation with the European Union (EU) and the uncertainty over Brexit could damage the country politically and economically, a U.S. expert said on Wednesday.

Speaking with China Global Television Network (CGTN) in Washington D.C., Yuval Weber, Kennan Institute fellow at the Daniel Morgan Graduate School, made the comments after a no-deal Brexit was fully ruled out by the British parliament.

British lawmakers on Wednesday night voted by a margin of 43 to confirm their decision to reject any no-deal Brexit. It means a no-deal Brexit was completely ruled out by the parliament in a vote which led to a second government defeat in less than one hour.

"So what happened today is that the government wanted the Parliament to reject no-deal, but what the Parliament did instead was offer an amendment that made no-deal a permanent policy of the Parliament itself. So what that did is it took away Theresa May’s ability to dangle no-deal against the Europeans, and the EU I should say, in order to get a better deal from them. So we’ll have going forward is that no-deal is not an option that Theresa May can point to, which limits her bargaining space with the European Union,” said Weber.

The parliament will also vote to decide whether to delay Brexit on Thursday.

The expert said the uncertainty over Brexit, in the worst case, may lead to civil disorder and more economic uncertainty in the UK.

"Worst case scenario is that it comes in two flavors. One, is that this sort of uncertainty just continues indefinitely, and what businesses will do is sort of like what people do under any sorts of stress, they just try to leave, they’ll come up with their own exit options, and what we would see is basically a slowdown of economic activity in the UK while this essentially works itself out," he said.

The expert said it is likely to have an economic recession in the UK if the Brexit process takes a long period of time.

"And if this could take months or years, then you would see just a general contraction of economic activity, general recession and that would be essentially the slow motion version. The quick motion version of the worst case is just basic pandemonium. The flights can’t come in and out of the UK, medicines don’t come in or out, food doesn’t come in or out,” added Weber.

Speaking of the impacts of Brexit on UK politics, Weber said it is a route to a divided Britain that a referendum on Scottish independence or a referendum on Irish reunification may occur. As the result, the Conservative and Labor parties would break part.

"So what probably I would say the biggest two sources of danger to UK politics, in terms of thinking where sources of stability, is that the UK as a political entity may also cease to exist, because both Northern Ireland and Scotland voted to remain. But one of the big issues here is what they have been calling the ‘backstop’. How does Northern Ireland be both on the Irish island as well as part of the UK, and what would happen if Ireland and Northern Ireland, as part of the peace agreement with the Good Friday Accords between Catholic and Protestant communities, if they don’t keep basically that border open, and there is some sort of no-deal Brexit, what would then happen is Northern Ireland would suddenly become very suspiciously this economic powerhouse, because it would basically be this backdoor between the European Union and the UK, and that would essentially go against the idea of Brexit itself. Additionally, there could be a secession referendum in Scotland for independence, there could be reunification referendum in Ireland," he said.

"And then when it comes to the internal British politics, it may not be possible for the Conservative and Labor parties to survive in the forms that have for the past one to two hundred years, because this is not about left, right, Conservative, Labor, but what is your idea of Britain, what is the idea of the UK, and that basically could break apart these parties and lead to a totally new vision for party politics within the UK,” he added.

ID : 8105634

Published : 2019-03-14 16:00

Last Modified : 2019-03-14 16:01:38

Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

More



Login
Username
Password
code
Sign In
OK