USA-Boeing Hearing/Analysis

Boeing's USD 50 million pledge to crash victims' families a proactive step: expert

  • English

Shotlist

FILE: Bishoftu Town, Ethiopia - March 12, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of rescuers, search operation in progress

FILE: Jakarta, Indonesia - Oct 30, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
2. Various of workers sorting, registering salvaged articles from crashed plane

Washington D.C., USA - July 17, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Seth Kaplan, transportation analyst (ending with shots 4-6):
"This is why Boeing presumably is now advancing that 50 million dollars. I think they understand that the world has sort of decided that Boeing does bear a lot of the responsibility here for what happened. And after sort of seemingly dragging their feet in the early stages with everything from the grounding itself, I mean the rest of the world had sort of done it, there was very little left to ground by the time Boeing agreed with the FAA to do it, to the weeks that followed sort of not taking that responsibility, sort of probably choosing the lawyers over the PR people, doing what might have been the right legal strategy not accepting blame but just looked awful. Now, finally taking this proactive step, paying out that money without that being imposed on them."

FILE: Bishoftu Town, Ethiopia - March 11, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
4. Various of wreckage at crash site

FILE: Beijing, China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Pictures of Boeing 737-Max 8 planes

FILE: China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
6. Various of Boeing 737 Max 8 planes, model numbers

Washington D.C., USA - July 17, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
7. Studio interview in progress
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Seth Kaplan, transportation analyst (partially overlaid with shot 9):
"It's something that goes on not only in the airline industry, other industries too where sometimes some of the best minds, some of the best scientists are working at the companies, and it could be hard for the government to compete for challenge. I mean sure there are plenty of competent people at the FAA too, but the question was it something nefarious, was it a deal between the FAA and Boeing or was it just that in some cases the FAA had to rely on Boeing. The answer to that, I'm not it matters all that much, the bottom line is we see what happened as a result, and I think you're going to see some big changes going forward."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
FILE: Washington D.C., USA - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
9. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sign, building
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

Washington D.C., USA - July 17, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
10. Studio interview in progress
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Seth Kaplan, transportation analyst (partially overlaid with shots 12-15):
"I don't think what mainly needs to change is perception. I think what mainly needs to change is reality. I think what mainly is going to change the public attitude towards this plane isn't calling it something else, it’s going to be getting it back up in the air safely and having a long period without something going wrong, and that’s when people will move on. Boeing, by the way, has said recently it's not going to change the name, so we'll see. Again, though I think that's probably less important than just getting the plane up in the air flying safely."
++SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

FILE: China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
12. Boeing 737- Max 8 plane
13. Number reading "737-8"

FILE: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - March 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
14. Various of grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 plane

FILE: Farnborough, UK - July 20, 2018 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
15. Boeing advertisement reading "The Future is Built Here"
++SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

FILE: Bishoftu Town, Ethiopia - March 10, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
16. Aerial shots of plane crash site

Storyline


The decision by aircraft manufacturer Boeing to dedicate 50 million U.S. dollars to the families of those killed in two horrific crashes involving the 737 MAX planes is a proactive step, said an expert on Wednesday.

The Boeing Company announced Wednesday that it has allocated 50 million dollars to address family and community needs of those victims who were killed in the "tragic accidents" of Indonesian Lion Air flight 610 and the Ethiopian Airlines flight 302.

The funds are part of the previously promised 100-million dollars fund, also involving the globally grounded 737 Max jets.

The two air crashes, both involving Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets, killed 346 people in total and led to the global grounding of the aircraft since the beginning of March.

Transportation analyst Seth Kaplan said that Boeing's move to provide compensation is a positive after many missteps in the weeks following the accidents.

"This is why Boeing presumably is now advancing that 50 million dollars. I think they understand that the world has sort of decided that Boeing does bear a lot of the responsibility here for what happened. And after sort of seemingly dragging their feet in the early stages with everything from the grounding itself, I mean the rest of the world had sort of done it, there was very little left to ground by the time Boeing agreed with the FAA to do it, to the weeks that followed sort of not taking that responsibility, sort of probably choosing the lawyers over the PR people, doing what might have been the right legal strategy not accepting blame but just looked awful. Now, finally taking this proactive step, paying out that money without that being imposed on them," said Kaplan.

On Wednesday, Paul Njoroge and Michael Stumo, who lost family members in the Boeing 737 airplane crash in Ethiopia, attended a U.S. House Transportation subcommittee hearing in Washington D.C., and accused Boeing of false conduct. They also suggested that the process to approve airplanes must be strengthened.

Kaplan said that the U.S. Congress will do more to provide the truth than make new onerous regulations.

Stumo, who lost his daughter in the Ethiopian Airlines flight, said at the hearing that the committee should end the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) policy of allowing designated airplane manufacturer employees or experts to do safety inspections of aircraft.

He also suggested that the FAA should return to a system where the employees are paid by the FAA but report to the agency and the company at the same time.

Kaplan said that these kind of situations have not only happened in the airline industry, but also in other industries, adding that there is going to be some big decision making in the future.

"It's something that goes on not only in the airline industry, other industries too where sometimes some of the best minds, some of the best scientists are working at the companies, and it could be hard for the government to compete for challenge. I mean sure there are plenty of competent people at the FAA too, but the question was it something nefarious, was it a deal between the FAA and Boeing or was it just that in some cases the FAA had to rely on Boeing. The answer to that, I’m not it matters all that much, the bottom line is we see what happened as a result, and I think you’re going to see some big changes going forward," said Kaplan.

Speaking on the recent re-branding by Irish budget airliner Ryanair of its fleet of 737-MAX planes to 737-8200, Kaplan said changing the name will not be enough to convince people that the aircraft is flight worthy.

"I don't think what mainly needs to change is perception. I think what mainly needs to change is reality. I think what mainly is going to change the public attitude towards this plane isn't calling it something else, it's going to be getting it back up in the air safely and having a long period without something going wrong, and that's when people will move on. Boeing, by the way, has said recently it’s not going to change the name, so we'll see. Again, though I think that's probably less important than just getting the plane up in the air flying safely," said Kaplan.

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8116366
  • Published : 2019-07-18 21:12
  • Last Modified : 2019-07-18 21:24:26
  • Location : United States
  • Category : disaster and accident
  • Duration : 2'24
  • Audio Language : English/Nats/Part Mute
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 3

USA-Boeing Hearing/Analysis

Boeing's USD 50 million pledge to crash victims' families a proactive step: expert

Dateline : July 17, 2019/File

Location : United States

Duration : 2'24

  • English

FILE: Bishoftu Town, Ethiopia - March 12, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of rescuers, search operation in progress

FILE: Jakarta, Indonesia - Oct 30, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
2. Various of workers sorting, registering salvaged articles from crashed plane

Washington D.C., USA - July 17, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Seth Kaplan, transportation analyst (ending with shots 4-6):
"This is why Boeing presumably is now advancing that 50 million dollars. I think they understand that the world has sort of decided that Boeing does bear a lot of the responsibility here for what happened. And after sort of seemingly dragging their feet in the early stages with everything from the grounding itself, I mean the rest of the world had sort of done it, there was very little left to ground by the time Boeing agreed with the FAA to do it, to the weeks that followed sort of not taking that responsibility, sort of probably choosing the lawyers over the PR people, doing what might have been the right legal strategy not accepting blame but just looked awful. Now, finally taking this proactive step, paying out that money without that being imposed on them."

FILE: Bishoftu Town, Ethiopia - March 11, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
4. Various of wreckage at crash site

FILE: Beijing, China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Pictures of Boeing 737-Max 8 planes

FILE: China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
6. Various of Boeing 737 Max 8 planes, model numbers

Washington D.C., USA - July 17, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
7. Studio interview in progress
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Seth Kaplan, transportation analyst (partially overlaid with shot 9):
"It's something that goes on not only in the airline industry, other industries too where sometimes some of the best minds, some of the best scientists are working at the companies, and it could be hard for the government to compete for challenge. I mean sure there are plenty of competent people at the FAA too, but the question was it something nefarious, was it a deal between the FAA and Boeing or was it just that in some cases the FAA had to rely on Boeing. The answer to that, I'm not it matters all that much, the bottom line is we see what happened as a result, and I think you're going to see some big changes going forward."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
FILE: Washington D.C., USA - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
9. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sign, building
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

Washington D.C., USA - July 17, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
10. Studio interview in progress
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Seth Kaplan, transportation analyst (partially overlaid with shots 12-15):
"I don't think what mainly needs to change is perception. I think what mainly needs to change is reality. I think what mainly is going to change the public attitude towards this plane isn't calling it something else, it’s going to be getting it back up in the air safely and having a long period without something going wrong, and that’s when people will move on. Boeing, by the way, has said recently it's not going to change the name, so we'll see. Again, though I think that's probably less important than just getting the plane up in the air flying safely."
++SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

FILE: China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
12. Boeing 737- Max 8 plane
13. Number reading "737-8"

FILE: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - March 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
14. Various of grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 plane

FILE: Farnborough, UK - July 20, 2018 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
15. Boeing advertisement reading "The Future is Built Here"
++SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

FILE: Bishoftu Town, Ethiopia - March 10, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
16. Aerial shots of plane crash site


The decision by aircraft manufacturer Boeing to dedicate 50 million U.S. dollars to the families of those killed in two horrific crashes involving the 737 MAX planes is a proactive step, said an expert on Wednesday.

The Boeing Company announced Wednesday that it has allocated 50 million dollars to address family and community needs of those victims who were killed in the "tragic accidents" of Indonesian Lion Air flight 610 and the Ethiopian Airlines flight 302.

The funds are part of the previously promised 100-million dollars fund, also involving the globally grounded 737 Max jets.

The two air crashes, both involving Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets, killed 346 people in total and led to the global grounding of the aircraft since the beginning of March.

Transportation analyst Seth Kaplan said that Boeing's move to provide compensation is a positive after many missteps in the weeks following the accidents.

"This is why Boeing presumably is now advancing that 50 million dollars. I think they understand that the world has sort of decided that Boeing does bear a lot of the responsibility here for what happened. And after sort of seemingly dragging their feet in the early stages with everything from the grounding itself, I mean the rest of the world had sort of done it, there was very little left to ground by the time Boeing agreed with the FAA to do it, to the weeks that followed sort of not taking that responsibility, sort of probably choosing the lawyers over the PR people, doing what might have been the right legal strategy not accepting blame but just looked awful. Now, finally taking this proactive step, paying out that money without that being imposed on them," said Kaplan.

On Wednesday, Paul Njoroge and Michael Stumo, who lost family members in the Boeing 737 airplane crash in Ethiopia, attended a U.S. House Transportation subcommittee hearing in Washington D.C., and accused Boeing of false conduct. They also suggested that the process to approve airplanes must be strengthened.

Kaplan said that the U.S. Congress will do more to provide the truth than make new onerous regulations.

Stumo, who lost his daughter in the Ethiopian Airlines flight, said at the hearing that the committee should end the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) policy of allowing designated airplane manufacturer employees or experts to do safety inspections of aircraft.

He also suggested that the FAA should return to a system where the employees are paid by the FAA but report to the agency and the company at the same time.

Kaplan said that these kind of situations have not only happened in the airline industry, but also in other industries, adding that there is going to be some big decision making in the future.

"It's something that goes on not only in the airline industry, other industries too where sometimes some of the best minds, some of the best scientists are working at the companies, and it could be hard for the government to compete for challenge. I mean sure there are plenty of competent people at the FAA too, but the question was it something nefarious, was it a deal between the FAA and Boeing or was it just that in some cases the FAA had to rely on Boeing. The answer to that, I’m not it matters all that much, the bottom line is we see what happened as a result, and I think you’re going to see some big changes going forward," said Kaplan.

Speaking on the recent re-branding by Irish budget airliner Ryanair of its fleet of 737-MAX planes to 737-8200, Kaplan said changing the name will not be enough to convince people that the aircraft is flight worthy.

"I don't think what mainly needs to change is perception. I think what mainly needs to change is reality. I think what mainly is going to change the public attitude towards this plane isn't calling it something else, it's going to be getting it back up in the air safely and having a long period without something going wrong, and that's when people will move on. Boeing, by the way, has said recently it’s not going to change the name, so we'll see. Again, though I think that's probably less important than just getting the plane up in the air flying safely," said Kaplan.

ID : 8116366

Published : 2019-07-18 21:12

Last Modified : 2019-07-18 21:24:26

Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

More



Login
Username
Password
code
Sign In
OK