Sweden-Nobel Prize/Chemistry

Three scientists awarded 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry for work on lithium-ion batteries

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Shotlist


Stockholm, Sweden - Oct 9, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of presentation by 2019 Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry
2. Cameramen
3. Various of awarding ceremony in progress
4. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Zou Xiaodong, deputy head of Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University:
"Now each of us has their contribution on our hands, which means that the development of smart phone, lap top and electric vehicle can not be separated from the lithium-ion batteries. In the future, I think it will promote more of the innovation and development of science and technology. Since based on the lithium-ion batteries, a lot of small and portable electronic devices can be produced, I think it is a great advance of science."
5. Various of presentation by 2019 Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry

Storyline


The 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to a trio of scientists for their works in the development of lithium-ion batteries, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday in Stockholm, Sweden.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino.

This year's winners for the award in Chemistry have laid the foundation for a fossil-free society and will share the prize worth nine million Swedish kroner or about 900,000 U.S. dollars.

John B. Goodenough, the father of lithium-ion batteries, commercialized them by making them smaller while being more powerful and more stable. He also started the process of making electronic devices portable. Goodenough is currently a professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin.

M. Stanley Whittingham, professor of Chemistry, is director of both the Institute for Materials Research and the Materials Science and Engineering program at the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Japanese Chemist Akira Yoshino is a 71-year-old honorary fellow with Asahi Kasei Corporation and a professor at Meijo University in Nagoya. Yoshino is the inventor of modern lithium-ion batteries and has won the Global Energy Prize, the highest honor in engineering, and the Charles Stark Draper Prize.

"Now each of us has their contribution on our hands, which means that the development of smart phone, lap top and electric vehicle can not be separated from the lithium-ion batteries. In the future, I think it will promote more of the innovation and development of science and technology. Since based on the lithium-ion batteries, a lot of small and portable electronic devices can be produced, I think it is a great advance of science," said Zou Xiaodong, deputy head of Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.

The foundation of lithium-ion batteries was laid during the oil crisis of the 1970s. When M. Stanley Whittingham developed the first functional lithium battery in the early 1970s, he used the huge power of lithium to release its external electrons.

Goodenough has doubled the potential of lithium-ion batteries, creating the right conditions for more powerful and useful ones. Yoshino created the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery in 1985, based on Goodenough's cathode.

Lithium ion batteries have revolutionized people's life since they first hit the market in 1991. They lay the foundation of a fossil-fuel-free society and have brought the greatest benefits to mankind.

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  • ID : 8123972
  • Published : 2019-10-10 13:23
  • Last Modified : 2019-10-10 19:23:00
  • Location : Sweden
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 1'56
  • Audio Language : Chinese/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8123972
  • Published : 2019-10-10 18:49
  • Last Modified : 2019-10-10 19:23:00
  • Location : Suède
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 1'56
  • Audio Language : Chinois/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : Pas d’accès dans la partie continentale de Chine
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8123972
  • Published : 2019-10-10 15:59
  • Last Modified : 2019-10-10 19:23:00
  • Location : Стокгольм,Швеция
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 1'56
  • Audio Language : Китайский/Естественный звук
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : Недоступно материковой части Китая
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8123972
  • Published : 2019-10-10 19:21
  • Last Modified : 2019-10-10 19:23:00
  • Location : Suecia
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 1'56
  • Audio Language : Chino/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No acceso a la parte continental de China
  • Version : 1

Sweden-Nobel Prize/Chemistry

Three scientists awarded 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry for work on lithium-ion batteries

Dateline : Oct 9, 2019

Location : Sweden

Duration : 1'56

  • English
  • Français
  • Pусский
  • Español


Stockholm, Sweden - Oct 9, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of presentation by 2019 Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry
2. Cameramen
3. Various of awarding ceremony in progress
4. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Zou Xiaodong, deputy head of Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University:
"Now each of us has their contribution on our hands, which means that the development of smart phone, lap top and electric vehicle can not be separated from the lithium-ion batteries. In the future, I think it will promote more of the innovation and development of science and technology. Since based on the lithium-ion batteries, a lot of small and portable electronic devices can be produced, I think it is a great advance of science."
5. Various of presentation by 2019 Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry


The 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to a trio of scientists for their works in the development of lithium-ion batteries, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday in Stockholm, Sweden.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino.

This year's winners for the award in Chemistry have laid the foundation for a fossil-free society and will share the prize worth nine million Swedish kroner or about 900,000 U.S. dollars.

John B. Goodenough, the father of lithium-ion batteries, commercialized them by making them smaller while being more powerful and more stable. He also started the process of making electronic devices portable. Goodenough is currently a professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin.

M. Stanley Whittingham, professor of Chemistry, is director of both the Institute for Materials Research and the Materials Science and Engineering program at the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Japanese Chemist Akira Yoshino is a 71-year-old honorary fellow with Asahi Kasei Corporation and a professor at Meijo University in Nagoya. Yoshino is the inventor of modern lithium-ion batteries and has won the Global Energy Prize, the highest honor in engineering, and the Charles Stark Draper Prize.

"Now each of us has their contribution on our hands, which means that the development of smart phone, lap top and electric vehicle can not be separated from the lithium-ion batteries. In the future, I think it will promote more of the innovation and development of science and technology. Since based on the lithium-ion batteries, a lot of small and portable electronic devices can be produced, I think it is a great advance of science," said Zou Xiaodong, deputy head of Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.

The foundation of lithium-ion batteries was laid during the oil crisis of the 1970s. When M. Stanley Whittingham developed the first functional lithium battery in the early 1970s, he used the huge power of lithium to release its external electrons.

Goodenough has doubled the potential of lithium-ion batteries, creating the right conditions for more powerful and useful ones. Yoshino created the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery in 1985, based on Goodenough's cathode.

Lithium ion batteries have revolutionized people's life since they first hit the market in 1991. They lay the foundation of a fossil-fuel-free society and have brought the greatest benefits to mankind.

ID : 8123972

Published : 2019-10-10 13:23

Last Modified : 2019-10-10 19:23:00

Source : China Central Television (CCTV)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

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