Bolivia-Violent Clashes

Unrest in Bolivia shows no sign of slowing down

  • English

Shotlist


La Paz, Bolivia - Nov 7, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of violent protest on streets
2. Fire
3. Various of protesters on streets, chanting slogan
4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Estefany Conde, student (starting with shot 3):
"We have been here since the elections on October 20. We are fighting, trying to defend our vote."
5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Sebastian Vasquez, student:
" Everything the President doing is unfair. We don't want there to be more deaths while the police do nothing."

La Paz, Bolivia - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
6. Protesters on streets
7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Patricia Paz, protester:
"I am not here for a political party or political color. I am here because I'm defending the nation, a sovereign and free Bolivia. We don't want a dictator."
8. Various of protesters chanting slogan
9. Bolivian national flag

Storyline


Violent clashes in Bolivia, between anti-government protesters and supporters of President Evo Morales, are showing no sign of slowing down amid calls for new elections.

Three people have died in the two weeks since voters went to the polls to cast ballots.

There were running battles and explosions as supporters of President Evo Morales squared off against his opponents, all of this in the aftermath of last month's presidential election and accusations of vote-rigging.

The battle for this disputed election is being fought on the streets of La Paz, down here students calling for the resignation of Evo Morales are trying to move further up the hill to the presidential palace where miners are protecting it with explosions of dynamite.

Tens of thousands of mostly young Bolivians have taken to the streets.

"We have been here since the elections on October 20. We are fighting, trying to defend our vote," said Estefany Conde, a student.

"Everything the President doing is unfair. We don't want there to be more deaths while the police do nothing," said Sebastian Vasquez, also a student.

Amid a divided opposition, a radical civic leader has emerged calling for President Morales to step down.

But continuing his presidential activities Friday, Morales -- Bolivia's leader of nearly 14 years -- said he will not resign.

In his toughest ever electoral race, Morales claimed victory on October 20 -- with enough votes to avoid a second-round runoff.

But many Bolivians shouted fraud after an unexplained 24-hour halt in the vote count, which when resumed showed a shift in favor of the incumbent president.
At the same time, Morales' supporters gathered at streets, defending their leader.

"I am not here for a political party or political color. I am here because I'm defending the nation, a sovereign and free Bolivia. We don't want a dictator," said Patricia Paz, a peaceful protester.

As divisions in the country deepen, Bolivians await the result of an election audit by the Organization of American States.

Many hope it could lead to an end to the unrest and uncertainty.

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  • ID : 8126756
  • Published : 2019-11-09 17:44
  • Last Modified : 2019-11-09 20:00:20
  • Location : Bolivia
  • Category : conflicts, war and peace
  • Duration : 1'02
  • Audio Language : Spanish/Nats
  • Source : China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 2

Bolivia-Violent Clashes

Unrest in Bolivia shows no sign of slowing down

Dateline : Nov 7, 2019/Recent

Location : Bolivia

Duration : 1'02

  • English


La Paz, Bolivia - Nov 7, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of violent protest on streets
2. Fire
3. Various of protesters on streets, chanting slogan
4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Estefany Conde, student (starting with shot 3):
"We have been here since the elections on October 20. We are fighting, trying to defend our vote."
5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Sebastian Vasquez, student:
" Everything the President doing is unfair. We don't want there to be more deaths while the police do nothing."

La Paz, Bolivia - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
6. Protesters on streets
7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Patricia Paz, protester:
"I am not here for a political party or political color. I am here because I'm defending the nation, a sovereign and free Bolivia. We don't want a dictator."
8. Various of protesters chanting slogan
9. Bolivian national flag


Violent clashes in Bolivia, between anti-government protesters and supporters of President Evo Morales, are showing no sign of slowing down amid calls for new elections.

Three people have died in the two weeks since voters went to the polls to cast ballots.

There were running battles and explosions as supporters of President Evo Morales squared off against his opponents, all of this in the aftermath of last month's presidential election and accusations of vote-rigging.

The battle for this disputed election is being fought on the streets of La Paz, down here students calling for the resignation of Evo Morales are trying to move further up the hill to the presidential palace where miners are protecting it with explosions of dynamite.

Tens of thousands of mostly young Bolivians have taken to the streets.

"We have been here since the elections on October 20. We are fighting, trying to defend our vote," said Estefany Conde, a student.

"Everything the President doing is unfair. We don't want there to be more deaths while the police do nothing," said Sebastian Vasquez, also a student.

Amid a divided opposition, a radical civic leader has emerged calling for President Morales to step down.

But continuing his presidential activities Friday, Morales -- Bolivia's leader of nearly 14 years -- said he will not resign.

In his toughest ever electoral race, Morales claimed victory on October 20 -- with enough votes to avoid a second-round runoff.

But many Bolivians shouted fraud after an unexplained 24-hour halt in the vote count, which when resumed showed a shift in favor of the incumbent president.
At the same time, Morales' supporters gathered at streets, defending their leader.

"I am not here for a political party or political color. I am here because I'm defending the nation, a sovereign and free Bolivia. We don't want a dictator," said Patricia Paz, a peaceful protester.

As divisions in the country deepen, Bolivians await the result of an election audit by the Organization of American States.

Many hope it could lead to an end to the unrest and uncertainty.

ID : 8126756

Published : 2019-11-09 17:44

Last Modified : 2019-11-09 20:00:20

Source : China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

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