USA-China/Relations/Cooperation

US experts call for cooperation when marking 50th anniversary of "Ping-Pong Diplomacy"

  • English

Shotlist


FILE: Beijing, China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Tian'anmen Square, Chinese national flag

FILE: Washington D.C., USA - Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
2. U.S. flag on Capitol
3. Capitol Hill

USA - Recent (CASS - No access Chinese mainland)
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Kenneth Lieberthal, former director, John L. Thorton China Center at Brookings:
"So if we look at the bottom line for U.S.-China relations during the first six months of the Biden administration, I think, first, don't expect a great deal, great revival of an era of comedy, high-level dialogue platforms and a rapid reembrace of going back to perhaps the Obama administration's strategy."

FILE: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - Sept 18, 2017 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Various of posters introducing ping-pong diplomacy between China, United States

USA - Recent (CASS - No access Chinese mainland)
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Carla Hills, Former U.S. Trade Representative:
"There will definitely be a change in how we handle our international relationships. First and foremost, I think the tone, [in which we deal with all international governments,] including China, would be far more diplomatic and strategic. And with respect to cooperation that the President has enumerated as his goal, he has mentioned climate, world health and denuclearization as areas where he believes our interests converge and enabling our two governments to work constructively together. He has stated that any progress in these key areas will require collaboration of the world's two largest economies."
7. SOUNDBITE (English) James Leach, former U.S. House Representative (ending with shot 8):
"With regard to China, it's been self-evident for decades now that peace in the world in the 21st century is going to be heavily dependent upon United States-China relations. And we're gonna have to impose both camps, put a great deal of emphasis on caution and I think we can come through this. And my own view is that the U.S.-China relations can make the world better, as well as our own countries better."

FILE: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - Sept 18, 2017 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
8. Various of posters introducing ping-pong diplomacy between China, United States

Storyline


U.S. experts called for collaboration while eradicating friction between China and the United States when looking back the "Ping-Pong Diplomacy" between the two countries 50 years ago.

Fifty years ago, the goodwill between the Chinese and the U.S. ping-pong players laid a foundation for the "Ping-Pong Diplomacy", which opened a new chapter in the relations between China and the U.S. Fast forward to international relations today, the goodwill that initiated this bilateral engagement has been eclipsed by the trade war, tech ban, blame game over the pandemic and anti-Asian sentiment, among others.

Standing at the crossroad, U.S. experts called for collaboration while eradicating friction.

Among the speakers at a virtual meeting held by the Institute of American Studies of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and the U.S. non-partisan Kettering Foundation, was famed China expert Kenneth Lieberthal, former director of John L. Thorton China Center at Brookings

"So if we look at the bottom line for U.S.-China relations during the first six months of the Biden administration, I think, first, don't expect a great deal, great revival of an era of comedy, high-level dialogue platforms and a rapid reembrace of going back to perhaps the Obama administration's strategy," said Lieberthal.

While serving as the director of the University of Michigan's Center for Chinese Studies, Lieberthal participated in the 30th anniversary of "Ping-Pong Diplomacy" along with former Chinese Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing at the university – the place that hosted the Chinese ping-pong team in April 1972. The university and Ann Arbor, the city where it's nestled, have developed an evolving rapprochement with Chinese scholars and students.

During Lieberthal's tenure as special assistant to former U.S. President Bill Clinton and Asian Affairs Director at the National Security Council, Sino-American ties ushered in a major watershed moment with both pledging to build a "constructive strategic partnership".

The veteran China-U.S. observer who wrote some 100 books and articles on China's elite politics, economy and foreign policies, believes that during today's geopolitical landscape, China and the U.S. may not rapidly reembrace each other but can seek cooperation in addressing climate change, conducting pandemic control and promoting denuclearization.

Former U.S. Trade Representative Carla Hills shared a similar view with Lieberthal. She believes that the bilateral relationship should not be based solely on transactions. Rather, it should encourage a more strategic partnership that increases areas of collaboration while eradicating areas of friction.

She predicted that there will be significant changes in how the U.S. handles its international relationships.

"There will definitely be a change in how we handle our international relationships. First and foremost, I think the tone, [in which we deal with all international governments,] including China, would be far more diplomatic and strategic. And with respect to cooperation that the President has enumerated as his goal, he has mentioned climate, world health and denuclearization as areas where he believes our interests converge and enabling our two governments to work constructively together. He has stated that any progress in these key areas will require collaboration of the world's two largest economies," said Hills.

James Leach, former U.S. House Representative, stressed that as the world's two large economies, a better U.S.-China relations can make the world better.

"With regard to China, it's been self-evident for decades now that peace in the world in the 21st century is going to be heavily dependent upon United States-China relations. And we're gonna have to impose both camps, put a great deal of emphasis on caution and I think we can come through this. And my own view is that the U.S.-China relations can make the world better, as well as our own countries better," said Leach.

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8187247
  • Dateline : Recent/File
  • Location : United States
  • Category : politics
  • Duration : 2'53
  • Audio Language : English/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN),Other
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Published : 2021-04-10 23:49
  • Last Modified : 2021-04-10 23:55:00
  • Version : 2

USA-China/Relations/Cooperation

US experts call for cooperation when marking 50th anniversary of "Ping-Pong Diplomacy"

Dateline : Recent/File

Location : United States

Duration : 2'53

  • English


FILE: Beijing, China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Tian'anmen Square, Chinese national flag

FILE: Washington D.C., USA - Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
2. U.S. flag on Capitol
3. Capitol Hill

USA - Recent (CASS - No access Chinese mainland)
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Kenneth Lieberthal, former director, John L. Thorton China Center at Brookings:
"So if we look at the bottom line for U.S.-China relations during the first six months of the Biden administration, I think, first, don't expect a great deal, great revival of an era of comedy, high-level dialogue platforms and a rapid reembrace of going back to perhaps the Obama administration's strategy."

FILE: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - Sept 18, 2017 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Various of posters introducing ping-pong diplomacy between China, United States

USA - Recent (CASS - No access Chinese mainland)
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Carla Hills, Former U.S. Trade Representative:
"There will definitely be a change in how we handle our international relationships. First and foremost, I think the tone, [in which we deal with all international governments,] including China, would be far more diplomatic and strategic. And with respect to cooperation that the President has enumerated as his goal, he has mentioned climate, world health and denuclearization as areas where he believes our interests converge and enabling our two governments to work constructively together. He has stated that any progress in these key areas will require collaboration of the world's two largest economies."
7. SOUNDBITE (English) James Leach, former U.S. House Representative (ending with shot 8):
"With regard to China, it's been self-evident for decades now that peace in the world in the 21st century is going to be heavily dependent upon United States-China relations. And we're gonna have to impose both camps, put a great deal of emphasis on caution and I think we can come through this. And my own view is that the U.S.-China relations can make the world better, as well as our own countries better."

FILE: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - Sept 18, 2017 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
8. Various of posters introducing ping-pong diplomacy between China, United States


U.S. experts called for collaboration while eradicating friction between China and the United States when looking back the "Ping-Pong Diplomacy" between the two countries 50 years ago.

Fifty years ago, the goodwill between the Chinese and the U.S. ping-pong players laid a foundation for the "Ping-Pong Diplomacy", which opened a new chapter in the relations between China and the U.S. Fast forward to international relations today, the goodwill that initiated this bilateral engagement has been eclipsed by the trade war, tech ban, blame game over the pandemic and anti-Asian sentiment, among others.

Standing at the crossroad, U.S. experts called for collaboration while eradicating friction.

Among the speakers at a virtual meeting held by the Institute of American Studies of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and the U.S. non-partisan Kettering Foundation, was famed China expert Kenneth Lieberthal, former director of John L. Thorton China Center at Brookings

"So if we look at the bottom line for U.S.-China relations during the first six months of the Biden administration, I think, first, don't expect a great deal, great revival of an era of comedy, high-level dialogue platforms and a rapid reembrace of going back to perhaps the Obama administration's strategy," said Lieberthal.

While serving as the director of the University of Michigan's Center for Chinese Studies, Lieberthal participated in the 30th anniversary of "Ping-Pong Diplomacy" along with former Chinese Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing at the university – the place that hosted the Chinese ping-pong team in April 1972. The university and Ann Arbor, the city where it's nestled, have developed an evolving rapprochement with Chinese scholars and students.

During Lieberthal's tenure as special assistant to former U.S. President Bill Clinton and Asian Affairs Director at the National Security Council, Sino-American ties ushered in a major watershed moment with both pledging to build a "constructive strategic partnership".

The veteran China-U.S. observer who wrote some 100 books and articles on China's elite politics, economy and foreign policies, believes that during today's geopolitical landscape, China and the U.S. may not rapidly reembrace each other but can seek cooperation in addressing climate change, conducting pandemic control and promoting denuclearization.

Former U.S. Trade Representative Carla Hills shared a similar view with Lieberthal. She believes that the bilateral relationship should not be based solely on transactions. Rather, it should encourage a more strategic partnership that increases areas of collaboration while eradicating areas of friction.

She predicted that there will be significant changes in how the U.S. handles its international relationships.

"There will definitely be a change in how we handle our international relationships. First and foremost, I think the tone, [in which we deal with all international governments,] including China, would be far more diplomatic and strategic. And with respect to cooperation that the President has enumerated as his goal, he has mentioned climate, world health and denuclearization as areas where he believes our interests converge and enabling our two governments to work constructively together. He has stated that any progress in these key areas will require collaboration of the world's two largest economies," said Hills.

James Leach, former U.S. House Representative, stressed that as the world's two large economies, a better U.S.-China relations can make the world better.

"With regard to China, it's been self-evident for decades now that peace in the world in the 21st century is going to be heavily dependent upon United States-China relations. And we're gonna have to impose both camps, put a great deal of emphasis on caution and I think we can come through this. And my own view is that the U.S.-China relations can make the world better, as well as our own countries better," said Leach.

ID : 8187247

Published : 2021-04-10 23:49

Last Modified : 2021-04-10 23:55:00

Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN),Other

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

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