China/Space-Chang'e-4/Payloads

Payloads of Chang'e-4 probe to facilitate various experiments: experts

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Shotlist

In Space - Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of moon surface

FILE: China - Exact Date and Location Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
2. Various of scientists checking device

Beijing, China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Robert F. Wimmer-Schweingruber, physics professor, Kiel University:
"Our instrument measures the dose rate or the radiation which astronauts would experience on the moon. If you were on the moon, both the neutral and the charge dose rate, and that's something which is important because that's the only risk, once an astronaut has come back from the moon, that's the only risk that remains."

FILE: China - Exact Date and Location Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
4. Various of photos showing scientists at work
5. Various of photos showing device

Beijing, China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
6. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Zhang Shenyi, co-principal investigator, Lunar Lander Neutrons and Dosimetry project (starting with shot 5):
"This instrument also plans to measure whether there is water on the far side of the moon’s surface, and its quantity. We hope to measure the quantity as precisely as possible."

In Space - Jan 3, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
7. Various of animation showing Chang'e-4 lander, rover on moon surface

FILE: China - Exact Date and Location Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
8. Photo showing device

Beijing, China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
9. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Zhang Aibing, co-principal investigator, Advanced Small Analyzer for Neutrals project (starting with shot 8):
"The payload will measure two kinds of particles - the ones brought by solar winds, which may be charged with electrons and later produce a hydrogen atom, and the other, original particles of the Moon, such as sodion, oxygen ion."

FILE: China - Exact Date and Location Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
10. Photo showing scientists at work
11. Photo showing moon, data

Beijing, China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Johan Kohler, head of the Space Situational Awareness, Rymdstyrelsen Swedish National Space Agency (starting with shot 11):
"It is very important to understand what happens when the solar wind crashes into the lunar surface, and it interacts there and spread particles around. And these particles form the extremely thin atmosphere like gases environment of the moon surface."

In Space - Date Unknown (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
13. Various of animation showing relay satellite Queqiao

Beijing, China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
14. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Ping Jinsong, co-principal investigator, Low-Frequency Explorer project (starting with shot 13):
"It (exploring the low frequency) aims to understand how that planet is rotating, what is the major cause of such activity. Whether all of these movements inside the solar system will affect human being’s lives is also a question."

In Space - Jan 3, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
15. Various of animation showing China's moon-probe facilities on moon surface

Beijing, China - Jan 3, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
16. Various of screen showing Chang'e-4 lunar probe landing; engineers monitoring landing at Beijing Aerospace Control Center

Shotline


With China's Chang'e-4 lander and rover successfully landing on the mysterious far side of the Moon, a series of experiments are going to be conducted over the next few months.

Scientists around the world have long dreamed of carrying out different kinds of experiments on the lunar surface but challenges like radiation and safety issues have always been a matter of grave concern.

The Chang'e-4 is installed with payload Lunar Lander Neutrons and Dosimetry. Jointly developed by Chinese and German scientists, the project is expected to overcome some of these concerns.

"Our instrument measures the dose rate or the radiation which astronauts would experience on the moon. If you were on the moon, both the neutral and the charge dose rate, and that's something which is important because that's the only risk, once an astronaut has come back from the moon, that's the only risk that remains," said Robert F. Wimmer-Schweingruber, a professor with Kiel University in Germany who took part in the Lunar Lander Neutrons and Dosimetry project.

Being one of the four internationally-developed payloads, these instruments are called the Lunar Lander Neutrons and Dosimetry.

Experts say they will not only help astronauts plan for future missions, but will also help in finding out whether there is subsurface water on the moon.

"This instrument also plans to measure whether there is water on the far side of the moon’s surface, and its quantity. We hope to measure the quantity as precisely as possible," said Zhang Shenyi, Chinese co-principal investigator of the Lunar Lander Neutrons and Dosimetry project.

Another payload, the Advanced Small Analyzer for the Neutrals, developed by Chinese and Swedish scientists, has taken on a different responsibility.

"The payload will measure two kinds of particles - the ones brought by solar winds, which may be charged with electrons and later produce a hydrogen atom, and the other, original particles of the Moon, such as sodion, oxygen ion," said Zhang Aibing, co-principal investigator of Chang'e-4 Advanced Small Analyzer for Neutrals.

Studying this unknown environment is key to extending mankind's knowledge of the solar system.

This instrument was jointly developed by Chinese and Swedish Scientists back in 2015. Experts said studying this unknown environment is key to extending mankind's knowledge of the solar system.

"It is very important to understand what happens when the solar wind crashes into the lunar surface, and it interacts there and spread particles around. And these particles form the extremely thin atmosphere like gases environment of the moon surface," said Johan Kohler, head of the Space Situational Awareness of Rymdstyrelsen Swedish National Space Agency.

And the Low-Frequency Explorer was installed on the relay satellite Queqiao. It was jointly developed by scientists from China and the Netherlands.

"It (exploring the low frequency) aims to understand how that planet is rotating, what is the major cause of such activity. Whether all of these movements inside the solar system will affect human being's lives is also a question," said Ping Jinsong, co-principal investigator of the Low-Frequency Explorer.

Over the next few months, scientists from around the world will receive first-hand data from their instruments. They say they will study and share their findings with other global experts in accordance with an open data policy.

The Moon is the Earth's nearest neighbor. Experts said it provides a natural lab for various studies and experiments.

They believe exploring the unknown far side of the Moon is of great importance to the overall study of the spacious space.

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