Canada-Radioactive Salmon

Radioactive salmon discovered in Canada due to Fukushima nuclear contamination

  • English
  • Français
  • العربية

Shotlist


British Columbia, Canada - Recent
1. Trees, sign at roadside
2. Sign reading (English) "University of Victoria"
3. Campus
4. Sign reading (English) "Bob Wright Center, Ocean, Earth and Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences"
5. Various of professor Jay Cullen showing research document
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jay Cullen, professor, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences with University of Victoria (partially overlaid with shots 7-8):
"In 2015, we collected an individual fish that we could detect artificial radioactivity in the fish itself. This contrasts with almost all the other fish we've collected on the order of about 400 fish over those three years where we were unable to actually detect any artificial radionuclides in the individuals. In this particular one, we can detect cesium-137 which is artificial, a man made radio nuclide, and so we decided to have a more careful look to see if some of that contamination was related to Fukushima. The way that we do that is to look for cesium-134 and that isotope has a relatively short half life of two years, and if we see cesium-134 in a fish today, we know that it has been affected by Fukushima. When we count for longer, we can see smaller and smaller amounts of radioactivity."
++SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
7. Various of new report about radiative salmon
8. Fish
++SHOTS OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
9. Salmon

Storyline


Canadian scientists have discovered radioactive salmon linked to Fukushima nuclear contamination.

Researchers at the Fukushima InFORM project in Canada, led by University of Victoria chemical oceanographer Jay Cullen, said they sampled a sockeye salmon from Okanagan Lake in British Columbia that tested positive for cesium 134.

This finding comes after seaborne cesium 123, which is thought to be an indicator of nuclear contamination from Fukushima, was detected on the West Coast of the United States this month.

It's the first time Canadian experts confirmed the news that radioactive plume has made its way across the Pacific to America's West Coast from the demolished Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in eastern Japan.

Cullen with his research team as well as 600 volunteers started their research on the Fukushima nuclear contamination in 2014 and have collected fish and seawater samples.

Cesium 134 is called the "footprint of Fukushima" because of its fast rate of decay. With a half life of only 2.06 years, there are few other places the dangerous and carcinogenic isotope could have originated.

"In 2015, we collected an individual fish that we could detect artificial radioactivity in the fish itself. This contrasts with almost all the other fish we've collected on the order of about 400 fish over those three years where we were unable to actually detect any artificial radionuclides in the individuals. In this particular one, we can detect cesium-137 which is artificial, a man made radio nuclide, and so we decided to have a more careful look to see if some of that contamination was related to Fukushima. The way that we do that is to look for cesium-134 and that isotope has a relatively short half life of two years, and if we see cesium-134 in a fish today, we know that it has been affected by Fukushima. When we count for longer, we can see smaller and smaller amounts of radioactivity," said Jay Cullen, professor of the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences with the University of Victoria.

It is important to note that airborne radioactive fallout from the initial explosion and meltdowns at Fukushima in 2011 reached the USA and Canada within days, and circled the globe falling out wherever the currents and precipitation carried it - mostly to places unknown to this day.

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8039190
  • Published : 2016-12-22 15:11
  • Last Modified : 2017-02-22 03:42:55
  • Location : British Columbia,Canada
  • Category : health
  • Duration : 1'37
  • Type : English/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8039190
  • Published : 2016-12-22 20:12
  • Last Modified : 2017-02-22 03:42:55
  • Location : Colombie-Britannique,Canada
  • Category : health
  • Duration : 1'37
  • Type : Anglais/Nats
  • Source : Télévision centrale de Chine (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : Pas d’accès dans la partie continentale de Chine
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8039190
  • Published : 2016-12-22 18:54
  • Last Modified : 2017-02-22 03:42:55
  • Location : كولومبيا البريطانية,كندا
  • Category : health
  • Duration : 1'37
  • Type : الإنجليزية/ الصوت الطبيعي
  • Source : تلفزيون الصين المركزي
  • Restrictions : ممنوع البث في بر الصين الرئيسي
  • Version : 1
Login
Username
Password
code
Sign In
OK