Japan-Coffee Nap Shop

Some Japanese take coffee for better sleep at noon

  • English

Shotlist


Tokyo, Japan - Recent
1. Various of customers drinking coffee, taking nap at Nescafe Harajuku coffee shop
2. Various of customers sleeping on beds
3. SOUNDBITE (Japanese) Atsushi Murata, head of marketing department, Nescafe Japan (ending with shot 5):
"We have a peak business hour of between one and two after lunch. Most customers are office workers."
4. Customer taking nap
5. Customer drinking coffee
6. Various of customers sleeping at cafe
7. SOUNDBITE (Japanese) Customer (partially overlaid with shot 8):
"I stayed up too late to play cellphone games and hit bed at about one o'clock in the morning. Here the bed is very soft and I have a nice sleep here."

++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
8. Customer sleeping at cafe
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

++MUTE++
9. Various of staff testing degree of drowsiness for customers
10. Customer checking at cashier
11. Various of beds at cafe

Storyline


While most people drink coffee to stay awake and sharp, some would take coffee before an after-lunch nap only to feel refreshed thanks to the retarded effect of caffeine, like these office workers in downtown Tokyo of Japan.

For the time-pressed customers, a quick nap on the coffee table would do; but for those not in a hurry at all, the Nescafe's Harajuku outlet in Ginza offers a three-hour coffee-lunch service set, starting with a nap coffee, treating customers onto invitingly comfortable beds and hypnotizing them with adjustably dimmed bedside lights.

The lullaby here starts with attaching brainwave sensors onto the heads of customers to test their levels of drowsiness. The test results decide the strength of coffee to be consumed before the customers hit either table or bed.

According to Harajuku baristas, the caffeine takes effect only about 20 minutes after one sips the beverage. So drinking coffee will not stop one from dozing off immediately.

"We have a peak business hour of between one and two after lunch. Most customers are office workers," said Atsushi Murata, head of marketing department of Nescafe Japan.

Many customers feel great with their coffee naps.

"I stayed up too late to play cellphone games and hit bed at about one o'clock in the morning. Here the bed is very soft and I have a nice sleep here," said one customer at Harajuku.

Coffee naps may become big business in Japan, because statistics show that more than 40 percent of Japanese sleep less than six hours a day to bottom at the world's daily sleep average. A study shows that low working efficiency and extra medical expenses inflicted by less sleep cause an economic loss of about 15 trillion yen each year in Japan.

So far, the sleep-aid market in the country has already expanded to a scope of 140 billion yen.

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  • ID : 8061016
  • Published : 2017-09-14 17:57
  • Last Modified : 2017-09-14 21:02:20
  • Location : Tokyo,Japan
  • Category : economy, business and finance
  • Duration : 1'15
  • Audio Language : Japanese
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 2
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