China-WTO Head/Globalization

China connecting int'l exporters and market, boosting globalization: WTO head

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Shotlist


Shanghai, east China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Aerial shots of venue of China International Import Expo (CIIE)

Shanghai, east China - Nov 5, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Roberto Azevedo, director-general, World Trade Organization (partially overlaid with shot 3):
"I hope so. It has everything to be one of those major events of the year. China today is importing around 1.8 trillion dollars every year. Exports and imports put in China's hands a share of around 11.5 percent of global trade. That's a lot, that's really a lot. And I would say that the business community presence here [of] more than 3,000 companies, 130 countries represented here, that shows that people are taking this seriously and that they see really an opportunity. China has been lowering tariffs, China has been opening up the economy, but entry into a new market is always very challenging. So the fact that the Chinese government is willing to help, is willing to set up the connections and build bridges between exporters in different countries and the Chinese market, that is very important and welcome."

++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
Shanghai, east China - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
3. Various of booths of enterprises
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
4. Various of National Exhibition and Convention Center, venue of China International Import Expo (CIIE)

Shanghai, east China - Nov 5, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Roberto Azevedo, director-general, World Trade Organization (starting with shot 4, partially overlaid with shot 6):
"It is a welcome development because it is indeed a tendency that we see more and more, which comes together with some nationalistic feelings. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is leaving a lot of people behind. So you have a large segments of the society that feel excluded. They don't feel that they are participants of globalization. They don't believe in the benefits of globalization. And that's wrong because a lot of their jobs actually depend on globalization, depend on exports and imports. And most of them don't really realize how important that connection with the world is for their own livelihoods. And I think that China's message here is very clear. But for China, its a no-brainer. China took hundreds of millions of people out of poverty through trade, through further integration with the world. So what is obvious for China is not obvious for the more mature economies and they, I think, need some input coming from dynamic countries like China."

++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
FILE: Beijing, China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
6. China's national flag, Tian'anmen Rostrum
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

FILE: Geneva, Switzerland - July 26, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
7. Various of WTO headquarters, WTO logo

Shanghai, east China - Nov 5, 2018 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Roberto Azevedo, director-general, World Trade Organization (starting with shot 7, partially overlaid with shot 9):
"I think the view that the WTO is a negative for any economy, is I think a simplistic and potentially misleading understanding. If the WTO did not exist, it would have to be invented. Because if we don't have it, what would prevail is the law of the jungle. Unilateralism would be rampant and in that scenario, everybody would be losing. And we have made so many different scenarios with a lack of cooperation like a full blown trade war, for example, or no trade among nations. And it's very difficult to tell what the impact would be, because it depends on the scenario that you are using to describe the situation. But in every single scenario - everybody loses, global economy diminishes significantly, the expansion of trade diminishes significantly, job creation diminishes significantly, the consumer purchasing power lowers significantly. Not in China and developing countries, everywhere. And in countries like the United States, the impact will be very high as well."

++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
FILE: China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
9. Various of containers, ships at port
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

FILE: Shanghai, east China - Date Unknown (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
10. Various of skyscrapers along Huangpu River

Storyline


China's willingness to build bridges between international exporters and the Chinese market is an important and welcome factor in driving globalization, said the head of the World Trade Organization (WTO) on Monday.

Roberto Azevedo, the director-general of the WTO, made the comments during an interview with China Central Television (CCTV) in Shanghai, where the first China International Import Expo (CIIE) is currently taking place.

Commenting on the first ever national-level import expo, Azevedo acknowledged China's central role in bringing so many countries together to boost imports and exports and praised China's pursuit towards further opening-up.

"China today is importing around 1.8 trillion dollars every year. Exports and imports put in China's hands a share of around 11.5 percent of global trade. That's a lot, that's really a lot. And I would say that the business community presence here [of] more than 3,000 companies, 130 countries represented here, that shows that people are taking this seriously and that they see really an opportunity," Azevedo said of the expo.

"China has been lowering tariffs, China has been opening up the economy, but entry into a new market is always very challenging. So the fact that the Chinese government is willing to help, is willing to set up the connections and build bridges between exporters in different countries and the Chinese market, that is very important and welcome," he said.

Azevedo also pointed out that China has sent clear signals that globalization can benefit everyone and noted how the country has successfully lifted millions from poverty through its approach to open trade and global integration.

"The Fourth Industrial Revolution is leaving a lot of people behind. So you have a large segments of the society that feel excluded. They don't feel that they are participants of globalization. They don't believe in the benefits of globalization. And that's wrong because a lot of their jobs actually depend on globalization, depend on exports and imports. And most of them don't really realize how important that connection with the world is for their own livelihoods. And I think that China's message here is very clear. But for China, its a no-brainer. China took hundreds of millions of people out of poverty through trade, through further integration with the world. So what is obvious for China is not obvious for the more mature economies and they, I think, need some input coming from dynamic countries like China," said the WTO chief.

Azevedo also moved to dismiss criticism of the WTO by the United States, with U.S. President Donald Trump having repeatedly threatened to pull the U.S. out of the WTO, and maintained that the organization serves a vital role on a global scale.

"I think the view that the WTO is a negative for any economy, is I think a simplistic and potentially misleading understanding. If the WTO did not exist, it would have to be invented. Because if we don't have it, what would prevail is the law of the jungle. Unilateralism would be rampant and in that scenario, everybody would be losing," he said.

"We have made so many different scenarios with a lack of cooperation like a full blown trade war, for example, or no trade among nations. And it's very difficult to tell what the impact would be, because it depends on the scenario that you are using to describe the situation. But in every single scenario - everybody loses, global economy diminishes significantly, the expansion of trade diminishes significantly, job creation diminishes significantly, the consumer purchasing power lowers significantly. Not in China and developing countries, everywhere. And in countries like the United States, the impact will be very high as well," Azevedo said.

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  • ID : 8095219
  • Published : 2018-11-08 14:24
  • Last Modified : 2018-11-08 19:25:21
  • Location : Shanghai,China
  • Category : economy, business and finance,politics,society
  • Duration : 4'19
  • Audio Language : English/Nats/Part Mute
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8095219
  • Published : 2018-11-08 19:20
  • Last Modified : 2018-11-08 19:25:21
  • Location : Shanghai,Chine
  • Category : economy, business and finance,politics,society
  • Duration : 4'19
  • Audio Language : Anglais/Nats/Partiellement muet
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : Pas d’accès dans la partie continentale de Chine
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8095219
  • Published : 2018-11-08 19:05
  • Last Modified : 2018-11-08 19:25:21
  • Location : شانغهاي,الصين
  • Category : economy, business and finance,politics,society
  • Duration : 4'19
  • Audio Language : الانجليزية/الصوت الطبيعي
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 1
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