Singapore-Robot/Labor Shortage

Singapore using robots to ease labor shortage

  • English

Shotlist


Singapore, Singapore - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of robot working
2. Logo of "Lionsbot"
3. Various of robot working
4. Mohan Rajesh Elara, professor at Singapore University of Technology and Design, watching his colleague operating computer
5. Elara writing on whiteboard
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohan Rajesh Elara, professor, Singapore University of Technology and Design:
"While it is on rental service, it makes it more affordable for these contractors to purchase them in large numbers and also they can relinquish on maintenance issue because maintenance could be handled in this case by Lionsbot, we can provide the maintenance support, so its light on the customer's end."
7. Various of Strobo working
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Choo Huiwei, Vice President, ST Engineering:
"It's able to actually listen for distress call, for example, and the robot knows exactly where is the call coming from. And last but not least, the robot itself is after all it's a robot, it's a machine, it's not emotional. So as a result, it's more reliable."
9. Camera on Strobo
10. Strobo talking with human
11. Zainal Bin Sapari, assistant secretary-general of National Trades Union Congress, talking with his colleague
12. Sapari operating computer
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Zainal Bin Sapari, assistant secretary-general, National Trades Union Congress:
"Really equipping our workers with the necessary skills for them to be ready, more resilient, as well as relevant. This could include equipping them with the necessary IT skills, with the necessary adaptive skills."
14. Various of Strobo working

Storyline


With their workforce aging and the number of patients with chronic diseases rising, Singapore has been grappling with a severe manpower crunch, so it is seeking a mechanical solution, creating some of the most hi-tech robots to help businesses manage their human resources.

By April this year, the first 100 robots named "Lionbot" will be used to clean many office buildings. The robots can scrub any type of floor and are always cheerful and pleasant.

As tall as an average six-year-old, the robot is designed to be efficient, compact and nimble. It can easily go through small doors and get into confined spaces.

But instead of selling it at exorbitant prices, it's creators at Lionsbot plan to rent them out as part of their "Robot as a Service" model.

Mohan Rajesh Elara, is a professor at the Singapore University of Technology and Design, and one of the brains behind Lionsbot.

"While it is on rental service, it makes it more affordable for these contractors to purchase them in large numbers and also they can relinquish on maintenance issue because maintenance could be handled in this case by Lionsbot, we can provide the maintenance support, so its light on the customer's end," said Elara.

The Strobo, a robot that serves as police officer, was instantly famous because of his role as the "Robocop" from the ASEAN summit held in Singapore last November.

Although it has an adorable shape and size, it is equipped with facial recognition, a built-in GPS, along with six cameras to allow a complete 360-degree view of its surroundings.

"It's able to actually listen for distress call, for example, and the robot knows exactly where is the call coming from. And last but not least, the robot itself is after all it's a robot, it's a machine, it's not emotional. So as a result, it's more reliable," said Choo Huiwei, the Vice President of ST Engineering.

Currently being tested at Gardens by the Bay, its biggest advantage is that it can patrol long distances without getting tired like its human colleagues, and can cover secluded areas and CCTV blind spots.

While this robot is performing time-consuming and laborious tasks, human officers are free to focus their time on more crucial and specialized functions. In an attempt to help manage the manpower crunch, Singapore has been encouraging automation in businesses. As part of the initiative, the city-state committed 450 million dollars to the National Robotics Program in 2016.

The National Trades Union Congress looks after workers' interests in Singapore. The assistant secretary-general, Zainal Supari said that they are not worried about machines taking over human jobs. Instead, the trade union encourages workers to improve their employability.

"Really equipping our workers with the necessary skills for them to be ready, more resilient, as well as relevant. This could include equipping them with the necessary IT skills, with the necessary adaptive skills," said Sapari.

Unlike other countries, robots in Singapore are not seen as a threat but a necessity. They are being deployed in a wide range of areas from hospitals to hotels. And with technology getting cheaper and more accessible, it would be safe to assume that robots will certainly be a huge part of Singapore's future.

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  • ID : 8102945
  • Published : 2019-02-11 17:54
  • Last Modified : 2019-02-11 21:58:01
  • Location : Singapore,Singapore
  • Category : society
  • Duration : 1'52
  • Audio Language : English/Nats
  • Source : China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 3

Singapore-Robot/Labor Shortage

Singapore using robots to ease labor shortage

Dateline : Recent

Location : Singapore,Singapore

Duration : 1'52

  • English


Singapore, Singapore - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of robot working
2. Logo of "Lionsbot"
3. Various of robot working
4. Mohan Rajesh Elara, professor at Singapore University of Technology and Design, watching his colleague operating computer
5. Elara writing on whiteboard
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohan Rajesh Elara, professor, Singapore University of Technology and Design:
"While it is on rental service, it makes it more affordable for these contractors to purchase them in large numbers and also they can relinquish on maintenance issue because maintenance could be handled in this case by Lionsbot, we can provide the maintenance support, so its light on the customer's end."
7. Various of Strobo working
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Choo Huiwei, Vice President, ST Engineering:
"It's able to actually listen for distress call, for example, and the robot knows exactly where is the call coming from. And last but not least, the robot itself is after all it's a robot, it's a machine, it's not emotional. So as a result, it's more reliable."
9. Camera on Strobo
10. Strobo talking with human
11. Zainal Bin Sapari, assistant secretary-general of National Trades Union Congress, talking with his colleague
12. Sapari operating computer
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Zainal Bin Sapari, assistant secretary-general, National Trades Union Congress:
"Really equipping our workers with the necessary skills for them to be ready, more resilient, as well as relevant. This could include equipping them with the necessary IT skills, with the necessary adaptive skills."
14. Various of Strobo working


With their workforce aging and the number of patients with chronic diseases rising, Singapore has been grappling with a severe manpower crunch, so it is seeking a mechanical solution, creating some of the most hi-tech robots to help businesses manage their human resources.

By April this year, the first 100 robots named "Lionbot" will be used to clean many office buildings. The robots can scrub any type of floor and are always cheerful and pleasant.

As tall as an average six-year-old, the robot is designed to be efficient, compact and nimble. It can easily go through small doors and get into confined spaces.

But instead of selling it at exorbitant prices, it's creators at Lionsbot plan to rent them out as part of their "Robot as a Service" model.

Mohan Rajesh Elara, is a professor at the Singapore University of Technology and Design, and one of the brains behind Lionsbot.

"While it is on rental service, it makes it more affordable for these contractors to purchase them in large numbers and also they can relinquish on maintenance issue because maintenance could be handled in this case by Lionsbot, we can provide the maintenance support, so its light on the customer's end," said Elara.

The Strobo, a robot that serves as police officer, was instantly famous because of his role as the "Robocop" from the ASEAN summit held in Singapore last November.

Although it has an adorable shape and size, it is equipped with facial recognition, a built-in GPS, along with six cameras to allow a complete 360-degree view of its surroundings.

"It's able to actually listen for distress call, for example, and the robot knows exactly where is the call coming from. And last but not least, the robot itself is after all it's a robot, it's a machine, it's not emotional. So as a result, it's more reliable," said Choo Huiwei, the Vice President of ST Engineering.

Currently being tested at Gardens by the Bay, its biggest advantage is that it can patrol long distances without getting tired like its human colleagues, and can cover secluded areas and CCTV blind spots.

While this robot is performing time-consuming and laborious tasks, human officers are free to focus their time on more crucial and specialized functions. In an attempt to help manage the manpower crunch, Singapore has been encouraging automation in businesses. As part of the initiative, the city-state committed 450 million dollars to the National Robotics Program in 2016.

The National Trades Union Congress looks after workers' interests in Singapore. The assistant secretary-general, Zainal Supari said that they are not worried about machines taking over human jobs. Instead, the trade union encourages workers to improve their employability.

"Really equipping our workers with the necessary skills for them to be ready, more resilient, as well as relevant. This could include equipping them with the necessary IT skills, with the necessary adaptive skills," said Sapari.

Unlike other countries, robots in Singapore are not seen as a threat but a necessity. They are being deployed in a wide range of areas from hospitals to hotels. And with technology getting cheaper and more accessible, it would be safe to assume that robots will certainly be a huge part of Singapore's future.

ID : 8102945

Published : 2019-02-11 17:54

Last Modified : 2019-02-11 21:58:01

Source : China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

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