S Africa-Shipwreck Discovery

Maritime archeologists discovery in S Africa believed to be of 1647 shipwreck

  • English

Shotlist


Cape Town, South Africa - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education, speaking at press conference
2. Debris of shipwreck
3. Book entitled "The Haarlem Shipwreck (1647): The Origins of Cape Town" by Bruno Werz
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education (starting with shot 3):
"Based on archival information, based on cartographic information, geological knowledge, geophysical surveys and finally test excavations, we think we have enough proof to say that we are 95 percent convinced that this is the wreck site of the Haarlem."
5. Footage showing underwater discovery
6. Researcher processing salvaged debris of shipwreck
7. Drawing of shipwreck "The Haarlem"
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education (starting with shot 7):
"I hope to fully expose the wreck, document it in great detail to the highest professional principles and possibilities. And then close it up again because it's best preserved in the situation where it is in now."
9. Debris of shipwreck
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rob Bouwer, Marine Excavation Contractor, Guerrini Marine Construction (partially overlaid with shots 11-12):
"The wreck is sitting between the high-water, low-level mark. So it's very much inter-tidal and it's in the sand. The problem is as we excavate, sand comes back, so we got to prevent sand from coming back. So we built a curtain, a seal curtain around the vessel, and the challenges are to excavate deep enough down, so that you can stop the sand from coming in from underneath it."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
11. Various of excavator operating; researchers working
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
12. Press conference in progress
13. Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education, speaking at press conference
14. Drawing of shipwreck "The Haarlem"

Storyline


A team of South African maritime archeologists believe they have finally discovered the site of a Dutch ship that was wrecked in a storm in Cape Town in 1647, and which is recognized as one of the most significant shipwrecks in the country's history.

The survivors of the Dutch ship "the Haarlem" came into contact with the indigenous people of the region, which eventually led to Cape Town being established. It's a mystery that has taken years to solve, and now the maritime archeologists that have spent years searching for the Haarlem believe her story and final resting place will finally be unearthed.

They used various investigative techniques, which shows almost with certainty that the Haarlem is buried just meters from the shore in front of the Dolphin Beach Hotel.

"Based on archival information,based on cartographic information,based on geological knowledge,geophysical surveys and finally set excavations,we think we have enough proof to say that we are 95 percent convinced that this is the wreck site of the Haarlem," said Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of Marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education.

The shipwreck is thought to be located on a local beach near Table Bay Harbour where the team has carried out extensive underwater searches and excavation. What they found were artifacts, which they sent for carbon dating and received encouraging results as they are wooden and predate the ship's construction date. Now a plan is being put in place to excavate the shipwreck.

"I hope to fully expose the wreck, document in great detail to the highest professional principles and then close it up again because it's best preserved in the situation that it is in," said Werz.

The ship's discovery has an incredible historical value to the city as it signal the birth of what is now the modern Mother City - Cape Town. The team believes that excavating the Haarlem is a bold plan, which will cost a substantial amount of money. The work includes constructing a protective barrier around the excavation site.

"The wreck is sitting between the high level low level mark,so it's very much intertidal and it's in the sand,so the problem is as we excavate the sand comes back,so we'll build a curtain,a seal curtain around the vessel,the challengers are to excavate deep enough down,so you can stop sand and water from coming underneath," said Rob Bouwer, Marine Excavation Contractor of Guerrini Marine Construction.

The Haarlem team is now applying for the necessary excavation permits, so that they can start the challenging task of finally unearthing the ship wreck, which may take place during the summer when the sea is the calmest.

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  • ID : 8119305
  • Published : 2019-08-19 22:01
  • Last Modified : 2019-08-19 22:03:19
  • Location : South Africa
  • Category : society
  • Duration : 2'17
  • Audio Language : English/Nats/Part Mute
  • Source : China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 2

S Africa-Shipwreck Discovery

Maritime archeologists discovery in S Africa believed to be of 1647 shipwreck

Dateline : Recent

Location : South Africa

Duration : 2'17

  • English


Cape Town, South Africa - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education, speaking at press conference
2. Debris of shipwreck
3. Book entitled "The Haarlem Shipwreck (1647): The Origins of Cape Town" by Bruno Werz
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education (starting with shot 3):
"Based on archival information, based on cartographic information, geological knowledge, geophysical surveys and finally test excavations, we think we have enough proof to say that we are 95 percent convinced that this is the wreck site of the Haarlem."
5. Footage showing underwater discovery
6. Researcher processing salvaged debris of shipwreck
7. Drawing of shipwreck "The Haarlem"
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education (starting with shot 7):
"I hope to fully expose the wreck, document it in great detail to the highest professional principles and possibilities. And then close it up again because it's best preserved in the situation where it is in now."
9. Debris of shipwreck
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rob Bouwer, Marine Excavation Contractor, Guerrini Marine Construction (partially overlaid with shots 11-12):
"The wreck is sitting between the high-water, low-level mark. So it's very much inter-tidal and it's in the sand. The problem is as we excavate, sand comes back, so we got to prevent sand from coming back. So we built a curtain, a seal curtain around the vessel, and the challenges are to excavate deep enough down, so that you can stop the sand from coming in from underneath it."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
11. Various of excavator operating; researchers working
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
12. Press conference in progress
13. Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education, speaking at press conference
14. Drawing of shipwreck "The Haarlem"


A team of South African maritime archeologists believe they have finally discovered the site of a Dutch ship that was wrecked in a storm in Cape Town in 1647, and which is recognized as one of the most significant shipwrecks in the country's history.

The survivors of the Dutch ship "the Haarlem" came into contact with the indigenous people of the region, which eventually led to Cape Town being established. It's a mystery that has taken years to solve, and now the maritime archeologists that have spent years searching for the Haarlem believe her story and final resting place will finally be unearthed.

They used various investigative techniques, which shows almost with certainty that the Haarlem is buried just meters from the shore in front of the Dolphin Beach Hotel.

"Based on archival information,based on cartographic information,based on geological knowledge,geophysical surveys and finally set excavations,we think we have enough proof to say that we are 95 percent convinced that this is the wreck site of the Haarlem," said Bruno Werz, CEO of Maritime Archeologist of African Institute of Marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education.

The shipwreck is thought to be located on a local beach near Table Bay Harbour where the team has carried out extensive underwater searches and excavation. What they found were artifacts, which they sent for carbon dating and received encouraging results as they are wooden and predate the ship's construction date. Now a plan is being put in place to excavate the shipwreck.

"I hope to fully expose the wreck, document in great detail to the highest professional principles and then close it up again because it's best preserved in the situation that it is in," said Werz.

The ship's discovery has an incredible historical value to the city as it signal the birth of what is now the modern Mother City - Cape Town. The team believes that excavating the Haarlem is a bold plan, which will cost a substantial amount of money. The work includes constructing a protective barrier around the excavation site.

"The wreck is sitting between the high level low level mark,so it's very much intertidal and it's in the sand,so the problem is as we excavate the sand comes back,so we'll build a curtain,a seal curtain around the vessel,the challengers are to excavate deep enough down,so you can stop sand and water from coming underneath," said Rob Bouwer, Marine Excavation Contractor of Guerrini Marine Construction.

The Haarlem team is now applying for the necessary excavation permits, so that they can start the challenging task of finally unearthing the ship wreck, which may take place during the summer when the sea is the calmest.

ID : 8119305

Published : 2019-08-19 22:01

Last Modified : 2019-08-19 22:03:19

Source : China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

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