USA-Import Expo/Smart Meter

US-developed smart meter works on energy consumption with AI

  • English
  • العربية
  • Español

Shotlist


Mountain View, California, USA - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Jabil employees at work
2. SOUNDBITE (English) David Wahl, general manager, Jabil Digital Office (partially overlaid with shot 3):
"We consume about 200 million dollars of electricity per year across our global footprint. So, if you start doing the math around that, any savings is a substantial material contribution to our bottom line and profit margin. We know how much a building is consuming by the electrical meter on the outside. Once we go on the inside, we really don't know what parts of the building or where we are consuming it."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
3. Wahl talking to reporter
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
4. Various of Wahl at work, browsing report
5. Employees at work
6. Jon Chu, CTO of Verdigris system, showing parts of Internet of Things smart meter
7. Various of Chu showing electrical panel
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jon Chu, CTO, Verdigris system (starting with shot 7):
"No conduit needs to be routed. Typical electrical work all requires its own separate boxes. But this just attaches natively to a panel and you don't have to worry about wire management as much."
9. Employees at work
10. Computer screen showing graphic of energy consumption
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Chung, CEO, Verdigris system (starting with shot 11):
"If you want to do this across a billion square feet of portfolio, that you have no idea where everything is connected to, you need a much more automated way of collecting all this information. So, the first layer of AI for us actually is a classification engine almost like an image recognition where we listen to the high frequency electrical information. We can tell you what kind of equipment is inside the building."
12. Various of computer screen showing graphic
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Chung, CEO, Verdigris system (starting with shot 12/partially overlaid with shot 14):
"And if something deviates from that forecast model, it won't know if it's a safety issue or if it's just wasting electricity or something, but it will tell you this thing is happening on this piece of equipment and this is what it looks like. From there, actually, often times you might be able to find things that could be a security threat."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
14. Computer screen showing chart
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
15. Devices
16. Employees at work

Storyline

Many global companies are converging at the second China International Import Expo (CIIE) in Shanghai to show their technologies. Among them an international company Jabil is displaying its smart meter that uses AI to cut energy consumption.

At the Blue Sky innovation center, the employees at Jabil were putting components onto circuit boards. With more than 250,000 employees working on products in more than 100 locations around the globe, Jabil is looking for new ways to get a handle on its energy consumption.

"We consume about 200 million dollars of electricity per year across our global footprint. So, if you start doing the math around that, any savings is a substantial material contribution to our bottom line and profit margin. We know how much a building is consuming by the electrical meter on the outside. Once we go on the inside, we really don't know what parts of the building or where we are consuming it," said David Wahl, general manager of Jabil Digital Office.

That's why Jabil is experimenting with a system called Verdigris, which can measure exactly how much energy each piece of equipment consumes.

Verdigris' headquarters is right in Silicon Valley. And it's located at the Nasa Research Center, a very special place where NASA collaborates with numerous startups to build innovations of the future.

Inside the Verdigris lab, team members are testing the internal parts of their Internet of Things smart meter.

Chief technology officer Jon Chu shows how the chain of sensors and the smart meter are installed in a typical electrical panel.

"No conduit needs to be routed. Typical electrical work all requires its own separate boxes. But this just attaches natively to a panel and you don't have to worry about wire management as much," said Chu.

CEO Mark Chung says traditional measuring tools require people to come in and look at what each sensor is connected to. Their system instead uses artificial intelligence.

"If you want to do this across a billion square feet of portfolio, that you have no idea where everything is connected to, you need a much more automated way of collecting all this information. So, the first layer of AI for us actually is a classification engine almost like an image recognition where we listen to the high frequency electrical information. We can tell you what kind of equipment is inside the building," said Chung.

Verdigris' AI is also able to forecast what will happen down the road in terms of energy usage and cost. It can even send out intelligent alerts.

"And if something deviates from that forecast model, it won't know if it's a safety issue or if it's just wasting electricity or something, but it will tell you this thing is happening on this piece of equipment and this is what it looks like. From there, actually, often times you might be able to find things that could be a security threat," said Chung.

Chung believes their smart IOT meter can lead to energy savings of between 20 to 50 percent, helping companies stay leaner while keeping the environment cleaner

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8126694
  • Published : 2019-11-08 20:19
  • Last Modified : 2019-11-11 15:34:13
  • Location : Mountain View,California,United States
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 2'32
  • Audio Language : English/Narration
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 3
  • ID : 8126694
  • Published : 2019-11-08 22:28
  • Last Modified : 2019-11-11 15:34:13
  • Location : ماونتن فيو,كاليفورنيا,الولايات المتحدة
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 2'32
  • Audio Language : الإنجليزية/صوت الشرح
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 3
  • ID : 8126694
  • Published : 2019-11-08 22:29
  • Last Modified : 2019-11-11 15:36:31
  • Location : Mountain View,California,Estados Unidos
  • Category : science and technology
  • Duration : 2'32
  • Audio Language : Inglés/Narración
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No acceso a la parte continental de China
  • Version : 3

USA-Import Expo/Smart Meter

US-developed smart meter works on energy consumption with AI

Dateline : Recent

Location : Mountain View,California,United States

Duration : 2'32

  • English
  • العربية
  • Español


Mountain View, California, USA - Recent (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of Jabil employees at work
2. SOUNDBITE (English) David Wahl, general manager, Jabil Digital Office (partially overlaid with shot 3):
"We consume about 200 million dollars of electricity per year across our global footprint. So, if you start doing the math around that, any savings is a substantial material contribution to our bottom line and profit margin. We know how much a building is consuming by the electrical meter on the outside. Once we go on the inside, we really don't know what parts of the building or where we are consuming it."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
3. Wahl talking to reporter
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
4. Various of Wahl at work, browsing report
5. Employees at work
6. Jon Chu, CTO of Verdigris system, showing parts of Internet of Things smart meter
7. Various of Chu showing electrical panel
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jon Chu, CTO, Verdigris system (starting with shot 7):
"No conduit needs to be routed. Typical electrical work all requires its own separate boxes. But this just attaches natively to a panel and you don't have to worry about wire management as much."
9. Employees at work
10. Computer screen showing graphic of energy consumption
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Chung, CEO, Verdigris system (starting with shot 11):
"If you want to do this across a billion square feet of portfolio, that you have no idea where everything is connected to, you need a much more automated way of collecting all this information. So, the first layer of AI for us actually is a classification engine almost like an image recognition where we listen to the high frequency electrical information. We can tell you what kind of equipment is inside the building."
12. Various of computer screen showing graphic
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Chung, CEO, Verdigris system (starting with shot 12/partially overlaid with shot 14):
"And if something deviates from that forecast model, it won't know if it's a safety issue or if it's just wasting electricity or something, but it will tell you this thing is happening on this piece of equipment and this is what it looks like. From there, actually, often times you might be able to find things that could be a security threat."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
14. Computer screen showing chart
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
15. Devices
16. Employees at work

Many global companies are converging at the second China International Import Expo (CIIE) in Shanghai to show their technologies. Among them an international company Jabil is displaying its smart meter that uses AI to cut energy consumption.

At the Blue Sky innovation center, the employees at Jabil were putting components onto circuit boards. With more than 250,000 employees working on products in more than 100 locations around the globe, Jabil is looking for new ways to get a handle on its energy consumption.

"We consume about 200 million dollars of electricity per year across our global footprint. So, if you start doing the math around that, any savings is a substantial material contribution to our bottom line and profit margin. We know how much a building is consuming by the electrical meter on the outside. Once we go on the inside, we really don't know what parts of the building or where we are consuming it," said David Wahl, general manager of Jabil Digital Office.

That's why Jabil is experimenting with a system called Verdigris, which can measure exactly how much energy each piece of equipment consumes.

Verdigris' headquarters is right in Silicon Valley. And it's located at the Nasa Research Center, a very special place where NASA collaborates with numerous startups to build innovations of the future.

Inside the Verdigris lab, team members are testing the internal parts of their Internet of Things smart meter.

Chief technology officer Jon Chu shows how the chain of sensors and the smart meter are installed in a typical electrical panel.

"No conduit needs to be routed. Typical electrical work all requires its own separate boxes. But this just attaches natively to a panel and you don't have to worry about wire management as much," said Chu.

CEO Mark Chung says traditional measuring tools require people to come in and look at what each sensor is connected to. Their system instead uses artificial intelligence.

"If you want to do this across a billion square feet of portfolio, that you have no idea where everything is connected to, you need a much more automated way of collecting all this information. So, the first layer of AI for us actually is a classification engine almost like an image recognition where we listen to the high frequency electrical information. We can tell you what kind of equipment is inside the building," said Chung.

Verdigris' AI is also able to forecast what will happen down the road in terms of energy usage and cost. It can even send out intelligent alerts.

"And if something deviates from that forecast model, it won't know if it's a safety issue or if it's just wasting electricity or something, but it will tell you this thing is happening on this piece of equipment and this is what it looks like. From there, actually, often times you might be able to find things that could be a security threat," said Chung.

Chung believes their smart IOT meter can lead to energy savings of between 20 to 50 percent, helping companies stay leaner while keeping the environment cleaner

ID : 8126694

Published : 2019-11-08 20:19

Last Modified : 2019-11-11 15:34:13

Source : China Central Television (CCTV)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

More



Login
Username
Password
code
Sign In
OK