Spain/USA-Climate Change/Expert

Addressing climate change is an investment opportunity, says environmental expert

  • English

Shotlist


Madrid, Spain - Dec 2, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of banners, signs of Climate Change Conference COP25

Washington D.C., USA - Dec 2, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
2. Dr. Andrew Deutz, director of Global Policy of Institutions and Conservation Finance at The Nature Conservancy, in studio with hostess
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Deutz, director, Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation, The Nature Conservancy (ending with shot 4):
"As the Secretary-General laid out, the world is well behind where it needs to be. So probably the most important thing we need to see are signals from governments that they are going to increase their ambition. The UN came out with a report last week, called the 'emission gap report,' which is measuring the difference between where we need to be to stay in a safe, stable climate where the world can be prosperous and where we are. And we need to significantly increase our emissions reduction if we are going to get to where we need to be to be safe and prosperous. So hopefully we are going to see this week there are some signals from countries about what they are going to do to increase their ambition to put us on track to stay in a safe, prosperous world."

Madrid, Spain - Dec 2, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
4. Various of COP25 meeting in progress, guests on stage, attendees

Washington D.C., USA - Dec 2, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Deutz in studio with hostess
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Deutz, director, Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation, The Nature Conservancy (ending with shot 7):
"We used to think that dealing with climate change was an economic cost. Instead, it's now, we understand, much less expensive. It's actually an investment opportunity to address climate change. It's going to be much more expensive to not deal with it. So those countries that step up and meet their emission reduction commitments will be driving the innovation and the technologies that will lead to further economic growth and prosperity in the 21st century. The countries that aren't dealing with climate change are the countries that are going to fall behind economically."
7. Various of Deutz in studio with hostess
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Deutz, director, Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation, The Nature Conservancy:
"In some cities in Australia and elsewhere, they weren't just the biggest climate demonstrations ever, they were the biggest demonstrations of any kind ever in the world. If you look at the polling right now in the United States, for people under 40, climate change is a visceral issue that needs to be dealt with, it's not partisan. I think the world has really turned a corner in understanding this. We are seeing that in youth activism, we're seeing that in the streets, we're also seeing companies making commitments. There're over 200 companies that have committed to go to 100 percent renewable energy. Google has already done that. A few weeks ago, Amazon committed not just to that, but committed to go carbon-zero by 2050. So you're seeing the corporate sector do it because they're responding to the demands from their customers."
9. Deutz in studio with hostess

Storyline


It is imperative for governments around the world to lay out specific steps in order to fulfill long-term goals in combating climate change, a cause that is much less costly than imagined and may generate new business opportunities, said an environmental specialist as the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) now underway in Spain.

The COP25 opened Monday in Madrid, where delegates are discussing measures to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement amid unclear prospects and challenges to multilateralism.

Andrew Deutz, director of Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation Finance at The Nature Conservancy, told China Global Television Network (CGTN) that he expects governments to make clear their short-term ambitions in addressing climate change to make sure that they are on track of fulfilling the long-term goals of emission reduction.

"As the Secretary-General laid out, the world is well behind where it needs to be. So probably the most important thing we need to see are signals from governments that they are going to increase their ambition. The UN came out with a report last week, called the 'emission gap report,' which is measuring the difference between where we need to be to stay in a safe, stable climate where the world can be prosperous and where we are. And we need to significantly increase our emissions reduction if we are going to get to where we need to be to be safe and prosperous. So hopefully we are going to see this week there are some signals from countries about what they are going to do to increase their ambition to put us on track to stay in a safe, prosperous world," he said.

Earlier in November, the United States formally initiated its withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, raising eyebrows of multiple parties as the unilateral move impacts global cooperation on climate change. In view of long-term environmental and economic prospects, Deutz believes that abandoning climate commitments means forgoing technological and business opportunities that will eventually lead a country to fall behind the times.

"We used to think that dealing with climate change was an economic cost. Instead, it's now, we understand, much less expensive. It's actually an investment opportunity to address climate change. It's going to be much more expensive to not deal with it. So those countries that step up and meet their emission reduction commitments will be driving the innovation and the technologies that will lead to further economic growth and prosperity in the 21st century. The countries that aren't dealing with climate change are the countries that are going to fall behind economically," he said.

The expert said the climate issue has already got sufficient public awareness worldwide.

"In some cities in Australia and elsewhere, they weren't just the biggest climate demonstrations ever, they were the biggest demonstrations of any kind ever in the world," he said, referring to multiple demonstrations around the world taking place in parallel with the UN Climate Change Summit 2019 in September.

Deutz maintains a positive view on the world coping with climate change, as the corporate sector is actively responding to the issue, even it is unclear if governments could keep up their promises.

"If you look at the polling right now in the United States, for people under 40, climate change is a visceral issue that needs to be dealt with, it's not partisan. I think the world has really turned a corner in understanding this. We are seeing that in youth activism, we're seeing that in the streets, we're also seeing companies making commitments. There're over 200 companies that have committed to go to 100 percent renewable energy. Google has already done that. A few weeks ago, Amazon committed not just to that, but committed to go carbon-zero by 2050. So you're seeing the corporate sector do it because they're responding to the demands from their customers," he said.

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8128906
  • Published : 2019-12-03 17:33
  • Last Modified : 2019-12-03 18:15:35
  • Location : Spain;United States
  • Category : environment
  • Duration : 2'20
  • Audio Language : English/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 2

Spain/USA-Climate Change/Expert

Addressing climate change is an investment opportunity, says environmental expert

Dateline : Dec 2, 2019

Location : Spain;United States

Duration : 2'20

  • English


Madrid, Spain - Dec 2, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of banners, signs of Climate Change Conference COP25

Washington D.C., USA - Dec 2, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
2. Dr. Andrew Deutz, director of Global Policy of Institutions and Conservation Finance at The Nature Conservancy, in studio with hostess
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Deutz, director, Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation, The Nature Conservancy (ending with shot 4):
"As the Secretary-General laid out, the world is well behind where it needs to be. So probably the most important thing we need to see are signals from governments that they are going to increase their ambition. The UN came out with a report last week, called the 'emission gap report,' which is measuring the difference between where we need to be to stay in a safe, stable climate where the world can be prosperous and where we are. And we need to significantly increase our emissions reduction if we are going to get to where we need to be to be safe and prosperous. So hopefully we are going to see this week there are some signals from countries about what they are going to do to increase their ambition to put us on track to stay in a safe, prosperous world."

Madrid, Spain - Dec 2, 2019 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
4. Various of COP25 meeting in progress, guests on stage, attendees

Washington D.C., USA - Dec 2, 2019 (CGTN - No access Chinese mainland)
5. Deutz in studio with hostess
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Deutz, director, Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation, The Nature Conservancy (ending with shot 7):
"We used to think that dealing with climate change was an economic cost. Instead, it's now, we understand, much less expensive. It's actually an investment opportunity to address climate change. It's going to be much more expensive to not deal with it. So those countries that step up and meet their emission reduction commitments will be driving the innovation and the technologies that will lead to further economic growth and prosperity in the 21st century. The countries that aren't dealing with climate change are the countries that are going to fall behind economically."
7. Various of Deutz in studio with hostess
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Deutz, director, Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation, The Nature Conservancy:
"In some cities in Australia and elsewhere, they weren't just the biggest climate demonstrations ever, they were the biggest demonstrations of any kind ever in the world. If you look at the polling right now in the United States, for people under 40, climate change is a visceral issue that needs to be dealt with, it's not partisan. I think the world has really turned a corner in understanding this. We are seeing that in youth activism, we're seeing that in the streets, we're also seeing companies making commitments. There're over 200 companies that have committed to go to 100 percent renewable energy. Google has already done that. A few weeks ago, Amazon committed not just to that, but committed to go carbon-zero by 2050. So you're seeing the corporate sector do it because they're responding to the demands from their customers."
9. Deutz in studio with hostess


It is imperative for governments around the world to lay out specific steps in order to fulfill long-term goals in combating climate change, a cause that is much less costly than imagined and may generate new business opportunities, said an environmental specialist as the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) now underway in Spain.

The COP25 opened Monday in Madrid, where delegates are discussing measures to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement amid unclear prospects and challenges to multilateralism.

Andrew Deutz, director of Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation Finance at The Nature Conservancy, told China Global Television Network (CGTN) that he expects governments to make clear their short-term ambitions in addressing climate change to make sure that they are on track of fulfilling the long-term goals of emission reduction.

"As the Secretary-General laid out, the world is well behind where it needs to be. So probably the most important thing we need to see are signals from governments that they are going to increase their ambition. The UN came out with a report last week, called the 'emission gap report,' which is measuring the difference between where we need to be to stay in a safe, stable climate where the world can be prosperous and where we are. And we need to significantly increase our emissions reduction if we are going to get to where we need to be to be safe and prosperous. So hopefully we are going to see this week there are some signals from countries about what they are going to do to increase their ambition to put us on track to stay in a safe, prosperous world," he said.

Earlier in November, the United States formally initiated its withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, raising eyebrows of multiple parties as the unilateral move impacts global cooperation on climate change. In view of long-term environmental and economic prospects, Deutz believes that abandoning climate commitments means forgoing technological and business opportunities that will eventually lead a country to fall behind the times.

"We used to think that dealing with climate change was an economic cost. Instead, it's now, we understand, much less expensive. It's actually an investment opportunity to address climate change. It's going to be much more expensive to not deal with it. So those countries that step up and meet their emission reduction commitments will be driving the innovation and the technologies that will lead to further economic growth and prosperity in the 21st century. The countries that aren't dealing with climate change are the countries that are going to fall behind economically," he said.

The expert said the climate issue has already got sufficient public awareness worldwide.

"In some cities in Australia and elsewhere, they weren't just the biggest climate demonstrations ever, they were the biggest demonstrations of any kind ever in the world," he said, referring to multiple demonstrations around the world taking place in parallel with the UN Climate Change Summit 2019 in September.

Deutz maintains a positive view on the world coping with climate change, as the corporate sector is actively responding to the issue, even it is unclear if governments could keep up their promises.

"If you look at the polling right now in the United States, for people under 40, climate change is a visceral issue that needs to be dealt with, it's not partisan. I think the world has really turned a corner in understanding this. We are seeing that in youth activism, we're seeing that in the streets, we're also seeing companies making commitments. There're over 200 companies that have committed to go to 100 percent renewable energy. Google has already done that. A few weeks ago, Amazon committed not just to that, but committed to go carbon-zero by 2050. So you're seeing the corporate sector do it because they're responding to the demands from their customers," he said.

ID : 8128906

Published : 2019-12-03 17:33

Last Modified : 2019-12-03 18:15:35

Source : China Central Television (CCTV),China Global Television Network (CGTN)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

More



Login
Username
Password
code
Sign In
OK