Qatar-Diplomatic Stalemate/Dialogue

Direct dialogue to help with Qatar diplomatic deadlock: analysts

  • English
  • العربية

Shotlist


Doha, Qatar - July 15, 2017
1. Qatari Ministry of Foreign Affairs building
2. French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani entering room for press conference
3. Sheikh Mohammed speaking

Doha, Qatar - July 16, 2017
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Ali Al-Hail Al-Mahmoud, political analyst (starting with shot 2-3, ending with shot 5):
"The focal point was the dialogue. All countries only can sort out their problems via communication and dialogue, not resorting to anything harsh. For example, a military action. And I don't think it would take place."
5. Various of vehicles moving on streets
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdlrahim Al Hour, economic expert (partially overlaid with shot 7):
"Talking about the international investment and the cash flow going to the GCC area, especially the stock markets, all the countries have been affected right now economically, because the international investment, they look into the region as a one-part. If any part of the region gets affected, all the region will be affected also."
++SHOT OVERLYING SOUNDBITE++
7. Reporters interviewing Abdlrahim Al Hour
++SHOT OVERLYING SOUNDBITE++
8. Street scene in Doha
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdlrahim Al Hour, economic expert (partially overlaid with shot 10):
"It's not necessary to find a 100-percent solution, total solution and come joint 100-percent like before. But it's very important to keep the connection. There is a new shape built for the relationship. And everybody should try to compromise, try to find out a new way to cooperate with each other."

Doha, Qatar - July 15, 2017
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
10. Le Drian speaking, Sheikh Mohammed listening at press conference
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++

Doha, Qatar - July 16, 2017
11. Port with buildings

Storyline


First the Americans and then the Europeans, but none could help loosen up the diplomatic deadlock surrounding the gulf state of Qatar. Some local analysts believe unless direct dialogue is back on, the stalemate has to linger on, from days into months possibly.

"The focal point was the dialogue. All countries only can sort out their problems via communication and dialogue, not resorting to anything harsh. For example, a military action. And I don't think it would take place," said Dr. Ali Al-Hail Al-Mahmoud, a local political analyst.

French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian was the latest outside mediator to arrive in the Qatari capital of Doha on Saturday.

But so far, neither Qatar nor any of the four Arab countries which set preconditions for resuming diplomatic ties have backed off a bit.

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have even advocated for pressuring Qatar with more sanctions and tightening international supervision of Qatar's capital reserves.

But local economists see adverse effects out of this prolonged diplomatic rift.

"Talking about the international investment and the cash flow going to the GCC area, especially the stock markets, all the countries have been affected right now economically, because the international investment, they look into the region as a one-part. If any part of the region gets affected, all the region will be affected also," said Dr. Abdlrahim Al Hour, a Qatari economic expert.

And the economist has noted that faced with sanctions from surrounding countries, the Qatari government has readjusted its domestic economic policies in order to make sure its internal supply and import-export balance develop well.

Qatar is trying to seek other and more trade partners across the world, added the doctor.

Though outside diplomatic efforts have been mostly made in vain, internal economic interdependence may be called to play its part to some extent, according to the same analyst.

"It's not necessary to find a 100-percent solution, total solution and come joint 100-percent like before. But it's very important to keep the connection. There is a new shape built for the relationship. And everybody should try to compromise, try to find out a new way to cooperate with each other," said Dr. Abdlrahim Al Hour.

On June 5, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Egypt and Libya severed their diplomatic ties with natural gas-rich Qatar over allegations that the latter is pursuing policies that are "destabilizing" the region and providing supports to regional "terrorist" groups and for Iran.

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  • ID : 8055903
  • Published : 2017-07-17 17:28
  • Last Modified : 2017-07-18 14:33:31
  • Location : Doha,Qatar
  • Category : politics
  • Duration : 1'23
  • Audio Language : English/Nats
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Version : 1
  • ID : 8055903
  • Published : 2017-07-18 14:31
  • Last Modified : 2017-07-18 14:33:31
  • Location : الدوحة,قطر
  • Category : politics
  • Duration : 1'23
  • Audio Language : الإنجليزية/الصوت الطبيعي
  • Source : تلفزيون الصين المركزي
  • Restrictions : ممنوع البث في بر الصين الرئيسي
  • Version : 1
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