China-Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway/Regional Development

Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway leads regional growth onto fast track

  • English

Shotlist


Jinzhai County, Lu'an City, Anhui Province, east China - Recent (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of expressway
2. Vehicles running
3. Aerial shots of tea park
4. Various of people picking tea-leaves
5. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Tourist (name not given)(starting with shot 4/ending with shot 6):
"We want to experience rural life and tea-leave picking here. The fresh air is fantastic."
6. Various of tourists taking photos on bridge
7. Tourists walking in village
8. Various of tea growers stir frying to dry tea-leaves
9. Aerial shots of expressway, buildings
10. Tourists in memorial hall
11. Map
12. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Wu Fangbing, person in charge of publicity work of Banzhuyuan Town (ending with shot 13-15):
"We are now connecting the 20 revolutionary sites together to create a quality tour route and build a name for this revolutionary town. On the one hand, it helps develop our tourism and drive the economic development. On the other hand, by making good use of the rich revolutionary resources and telling the history and stories, we hope every tourist can get to know the history here."
13. Sign showing "Red Town, Banzhuyuan"
14. Various of map, photos
15. People walking into revolutionary site
16. Aerial shots of expressway

Badong County, Hubei Province, central China - Recent (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
17. Aerial shot of mountain, lake
18. Various of farmers picking oranges; basket of oranges
19. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Chen Xiaoyan, orange grower (partially overlaid with shot 20):
"In the past, there was no expressway. The oranges were sold for only two yuan a kilogram. I could earn no more than 40,000 to 50,000 yuan a year. After the expressway was open, our oranges can be sold for four to five yuan a kilogram. I can earn about 200,000 yuan a year."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
20. Growers selecting oranges
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
21. Various of people carrying basket of oranges, loading on truck
22. Aerial shots of truck running on road
23. Aerial shots of expressway, toll gate
24. Oranges
25. Man packing oranges into boxes
26. Expressway bridge
27. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Tan Sanqiang, truck driver (starting with shot 24-26/ending with shot 28):
"[Now] upon receiving clients' orders, we'll pick up oranges, pack and load them on vehicle immediately before sending the fruit away through courier companies. It only takes half an hour to get on the expressway and in another two hours, the products will be transported to Jinzhou distribution center. Normally after being sorted there, the products will be sent to the clients in the province on the second day, and it takes no more than three days to deliver them to clients in other provinces."
28. Tan, Chen carrying basket of oranges
29. Various of orange promotion through livestreaming

Badong County, Hubei Province, central China - April 10, 2021 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
30. Aerial shot of mountain, brook, boats
31. Various of tourists on boats
32. Various of brook
33. Houses
34. Aerial shots of viewing platform

Storyline


As a saying goes "A region has to build roads if it wants to build wealth", the Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway or Hu-Rong Expressway, linking Shanghai and Chengdu in southwest China and spanning six provinces and cities, has certainly proved it by driving the economic development of areas along the road.

The 1,966-kilometer-long Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway was put into full operation on Dec. 27, 2014, linking Shanghai Municipality, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces in east China, Hubei Province in central China, Chongqing Municipality and Sichuan Province in southwest China.

Stretching over 90 kilometers, the Jinzhai section of the expressway is the first ever such thoroughfare for Jinzhai County in east China's Anhui Province, which has not only facilitated the local transportation but also attracted urbanites to enjoy some fresh air here.

Zheng Xuewei is a tea grower in the county. Around the Qingming Festival Festival, also known as the Tomb-sweeping Day, like other tea growers, Zheng got busy picking tea-leaves while receiving tourists.

Zheng said his tea park is a part of the Chagu scenic area, an integration of many tea parks covering altogether over 500 mu (about 33 hectares). The scenic area has now been built into an ecological park with a suspension bridge, footpaths and galleries.

Zheng taught tourists how to pick tea-leaves and showed them how to stir fry and bake tea-leaves.

A group of tourists said they drove here from Shanghai very conveniently through the expressway.

"We want to experience rural life and tea-leave picking here. The fresh air is fantastic," said a tourist.

Now, Zheng's family has shaken off poverty and he can earn more than 100,000 yuan (15,000 U.S. dollars) a year.

On the western side of the Jinzhai section of the Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway, Banzhuyuan Town relies on its rich revolutionary history to draw tourists to the town.

The town is home to more than 20 revolutionary sites and seven generals who made great contributions to the founding of the People's Republic of China.

"We are now connecting the 20 revolutionary sites together to create a quality tour route and build a name for this revolutionary town. On the one hand, it helps develop our tourism and drive the economic development. On the other hand, by making good use of the rich revolutionary resources and telling the history and stories, we hope every tourist can get to know the history here," said Wu Fangbing, who is in charge of the town's publicity work.

So far, all the villages in Jinzhai County have access to cement roads and a 4C-level airport is under construction.

Similar to Anhui Province, many places in Hubei Province, west of Anhui Province on the expressway, are benefiting from the thoroughfare which has made it easier to introduce their local products to places across the country.

Located in southwestern part of Hubei, Badong County used to be a national-level poor county before it shook off poverty in April last year.

Mountainous terrain and various canyons have been one of the main reasons that restricted local development. Thanks to the expressway, agricultural products including oranges are transported out of the mountainous area and brought good income to local people.

"In the past, there was no expressway. The oranges were sold for only two yuan a kilogram. I could earn no more than 40,000 to 50,000 yuan a year. After the expressway was open, our oranges can be sold for four to five yuan a kilogram. I can earn about 200,000 yuan a year," said Chen Xiaoyan, an orange grower.

"[Now] upon receiving clients' orders, we'll pick up oranges, pack and load them on vehicle immediately before sending the fruit away through courier companies. It only takes half an hour to get on the expressway and in another two hours, the products will be transported to Jinzhou distribution center. Normally after being sorted there, the products will be sent to the clients in the province on the second day, and it takes no more than three days to deliver them to clients in other provinces," said Tan Sanqiang, a truck driver.

With the transportation problem solved, Badong County can generate income of 760 million yuan (115 million U.S. dollars) from its local fruits, and more than 40,000 households have got rid of poverty and become better off.

In addition to promoting local products, the county is actively developing ecological tourism to draw tourists to appreciate its green mountains and rivers.

According to local culture and tourism bureau, Badong County received 4.7 million tourists and achieved a revenue of 2.826 billion yuan (about 430 million U.S. dollars) in 2020, ranking third in Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture of Hubei.

DOWNLOAD
  • ID : 8187129
  • Dateline : April 10, 2021/Recent
  • Location : China
  • Category : economy, business and finance,environment
  • Duration : 4'09
  • Audio Language : Chinese/Nats/Part Mute/Live Report
  • Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
  • Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
  • Published : 2021-04-10 21:11
  • Last Modified : 2021-04-10 21:16:00
  • Version : 2

China-Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway/Regional Development

Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway leads regional growth onto fast track

Dateline : April 10, 2021/Recent

Location : China

Duration : 4'09

  • English


Jinzhai County, Lu'an City, Anhui Province, east China - Recent (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
1. Various of expressway
2. Vehicles running
3. Aerial shots of tea park
4. Various of people picking tea-leaves
5. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Tourist (name not given)(starting with shot 4/ending with shot 6):
"We want to experience rural life and tea-leave picking here. The fresh air is fantastic."
6. Various of tourists taking photos on bridge
7. Tourists walking in village
8. Various of tea growers stir frying to dry tea-leaves
9. Aerial shots of expressway, buildings
10. Tourists in memorial hall
11. Map
12. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Wu Fangbing, person in charge of publicity work of Banzhuyuan Town (ending with shot 13-15):
"We are now connecting the 20 revolutionary sites together to create a quality tour route and build a name for this revolutionary town. On the one hand, it helps develop our tourism and drive the economic development. On the other hand, by making good use of the rich revolutionary resources and telling the history and stories, we hope every tourist can get to know the history here."
13. Sign showing "Red Town, Banzhuyuan"
14. Various of map, photos
15. People walking into revolutionary site
16. Aerial shots of expressway

Badong County, Hubei Province, central China - Recent (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
17. Aerial shot of mountain, lake
18. Various of farmers picking oranges; basket of oranges
19. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Chen Xiaoyan, orange grower (partially overlaid with shot 20):
"In the past, there was no expressway. The oranges were sold for only two yuan a kilogram. I could earn no more than 40,000 to 50,000 yuan a year. After the expressway was open, our oranges can be sold for four to five yuan a kilogram. I can earn about 200,000 yuan a year."
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
20. Growers selecting oranges
++SHOT OVERLAYING SOUNDBITE++
21. Various of people carrying basket of oranges, loading on truck
22. Aerial shots of truck running on road
23. Aerial shots of expressway, toll gate
24. Oranges
25. Man packing oranges into boxes
26. Expressway bridge
27. SOUNDBITE (Chinese) Tan Sanqiang, truck driver (starting with shot 24-26/ending with shot 28):
"[Now] upon receiving clients' orders, we'll pick up oranges, pack and load them on vehicle immediately before sending the fruit away through courier companies. It only takes half an hour to get on the expressway and in another two hours, the products will be transported to Jinzhou distribution center. Normally after being sorted there, the products will be sent to the clients in the province on the second day, and it takes no more than three days to deliver them to clients in other provinces."
28. Tan, Chen carrying basket of oranges
29. Various of orange promotion through livestreaming

Badong County, Hubei Province, central China - April 10, 2021 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)
30. Aerial shot of mountain, brook, boats
31. Various of tourists on boats
32. Various of brook
33. Houses
34. Aerial shots of viewing platform


As a saying goes "A region has to build roads if it wants to build wealth", the Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway or Hu-Rong Expressway, linking Shanghai and Chengdu in southwest China and spanning six provinces and cities, has certainly proved it by driving the economic development of areas along the road.

The 1,966-kilometer-long Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway was put into full operation on Dec. 27, 2014, linking Shanghai Municipality, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces in east China, Hubei Province in central China, Chongqing Municipality and Sichuan Province in southwest China.

Stretching over 90 kilometers, the Jinzhai section of the expressway is the first ever such thoroughfare for Jinzhai County in east China's Anhui Province, which has not only facilitated the local transportation but also attracted urbanites to enjoy some fresh air here.

Zheng Xuewei is a tea grower in the county. Around the Qingming Festival Festival, also known as the Tomb-sweeping Day, like other tea growers, Zheng got busy picking tea-leaves while receiving tourists.

Zheng said his tea park is a part of the Chagu scenic area, an integration of many tea parks covering altogether over 500 mu (about 33 hectares). The scenic area has now been built into an ecological park with a suspension bridge, footpaths and galleries.

Zheng taught tourists how to pick tea-leaves and showed them how to stir fry and bake tea-leaves.

A group of tourists said they drove here from Shanghai very conveniently through the expressway.

"We want to experience rural life and tea-leave picking here. The fresh air is fantastic," said a tourist.

Now, Zheng's family has shaken off poverty and he can earn more than 100,000 yuan (15,000 U.S. dollars) a year.

On the western side of the Jinzhai section of the Shanghai-Chengdu Expressway, Banzhuyuan Town relies on its rich revolutionary history to draw tourists to the town.

The town is home to more than 20 revolutionary sites and seven generals who made great contributions to the founding of the People's Republic of China.

"We are now connecting the 20 revolutionary sites together to create a quality tour route and build a name for this revolutionary town. On the one hand, it helps develop our tourism and drive the economic development. On the other hand, by making good use of the rich revolutionary resources and telling the history and stories, we hope every tourist can get to know the history here," said Wu Fangbing, who is in charge of the town's publicity work.

So far, all the villages in Jinzhai County have access to cement roads and a 4C-level airport is under construction.

Similar to Anhui Province, many places in Hubei Province, west of Anhui Province on the expressway, are benefiting from the thoroughfare which has made it easier to introduce their local products to places across the country.

Located in southwestern part of Hubei, Badong County used to be a national-level poor county before it shook off poverty in April last year.

Mountainous terrain and various canyons have been one of the main reasons that restricted local development. Thanks to the expressway, agricultural products including oranges are transported out of the mountainous area and brought good income to local people.

"In the past, there was no expressway. The oranges were sold for only two yuan a kilogram. I could earn no more than 40,000 to 50,000 yuan a year. After the expressway was open, our oranges can be sold for four to five yuan a kilogram. I can earn about 200,000 yuan a year," said Chen Xiaoyan, an orange grower.

"[Now] upon receiving clients' orders, we'll pick up oranges, pack and load them on vehicle immediately before sending the fruit away through courier companies. It only takes half an hour to get on the expressway and in another two hours, the products will be transported to Jinzhou distribution center. Normally after being sorted there, the products will be sent to the clients in the province on the second day, and it takes no more than three days to deliver them to clients in other provinces," said Tan Sanqiang, a truck driver.

With the transportation problem solved, Badong County can generate income of 760 million yuan (115 million U.S. dollars) from its local fruits, and more than 40,000 households have got rid of poverty and become better off.

In addition to promoting local products, the county is actively developing ecological tourism to draw tourists to appreciate its green mountains and rivers.

According to local culture and tourism bureau, Badong County received 4.7 million tourists and achieved a revenue of 2.826 billion yuan (about 430 million U.S. dollars) in 2020, ranking third in Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture of Hubei.

ID : 8187129

Published : 2021-04-10 21:11

Last Modified : 2021-04-10 21:16:00

Source : China Central Television (CCTV)

Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland

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